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Justine B. Allen and Colleen Reid

direction for change that can enhance the experiences and provisions of coach education and development for women coaches. Coach Learning and Development Coaches’ learning situations have been described as formal, involving structured programs that require participants to achieve certain standards and

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Andrew P. Driska and Daniel R. Gould

Research has shown that coaches learn through reflective practice (Trudel & Gilbert, 2006), that communities of practice can assist the reflective process (Culver & Trudel, 2008), and that problem-based learning can increase critical thought by coaches (Jones & Turner, 2006). To help coaches develop reflective practice skills in an online course, the authors designed and implemented a novel assignment combining the principles of a community of practice with problem-based learning. Small groups of students were presented with a problem scenario and then met synchronously online using a low bandwidth group chat application (EtherPad) to diagnose the problem, strategize, and outline a solution. Students were able to conduct group meetings with only minor technical diffculties, and their written work demonstrated that a moderate level of refection had occurred. Future assignment redesigns should allow more opportunities for student-instructor interaction to facilitate greater development of student reflective practice skills.

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Christopher Cushion and Robyn L. Jones

A sociological analysis was conducted into the collective nature of coaching as manifest in the triangular interaction between coach, athlete, and context within English professional youth soccer. The work of Pierre Bourdieu is predominantly used to interpret data collected ethnographically over the course of a 10-month season. Findings show how an authoritarian discourse is established and maintained, how it is structured by and subsequently structures the coaching context, and how accompanying behaviors are misrecognized as legitimate by both coaches and players. We conclude by reflecting on the limits of such work and its implications for future coaching education.

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Nicole M. LaVoi, Erin Becker and Heather D. Maxwell

Given the lack of nationalized and required coach education programs for those involved with youth sports, self-help coaching books are a common source of knowledge. With the exception of critiques of young adult sports fiction (Kane, 1998; Kreigh & Kane, 1997), sport media research has lacked investigation of mediums that impact non-elite youth athletes and adolescent girls, and youth coaches and parents of young female athletes. The purpose of this study is to examine ‘coaching girls’ books–specifically how differences between female and male athletes are constructed. A content analysis was performed on selective chapters within a criterion sampling of six best-selling, self-help ‘coaching girls’ books. Results indicate coaching girls books are written from a perspective of inflated gender difference, and represent a simplified, stereo-typed account of coaching girls. Four first-order themes emerged from analysis: Problematizing Coaching Girls, Girls Constructed As “Other,” Ambivalence, and Sustaining the Gender Binary. Implications of these themes are discussed.

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Leanne Norman

III), UEFA A License (Level IV), and the highest qualification, UEFA Pro License. Members of the coach education workforce delivering these courses to coaches at the various points of the pathway are known as coach developers. At the time of the research, coaches (men or women) were permitted onto the

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Diane M. Culver, Erin Kraft, Cari Din and Isabelle Cayer

) including Coach Education Coordinators, Executive Directors, Managers, Associate Athletic Directors, and Member Services Coordinators. As for the mentors, they were selected for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to: leadership qualities, success in the sport community, capacity to be a strong

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Anne Tjønndal

competitive age classifications 4 and 4) female coaches both with and without formal coach education. Participants were recruited through my own informal and formal sporting networks in Norwegian boxing. 5 The final sample consisted of seven female boxers and three female boxing coaches, representing a wide

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Kamiel Reid and Christine Dallaire

. & Meân , L. ( 2008 ). Standards and separatism: The discursive construction of gender in English soccer coach education . Sex Roles; A Journal of Research, 58 ( 1 ), 24 – 39 . doi:10.1007/s11199-007-9334-x 10.1007/s11199-007-9334-x Fielding?Lloyd , B. & Meân , L. ( 2011 ). “I don't think I

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Clayton R. Kuklick and Brian T. Gearity

arguments or materials for coach education. Recent studies add nuance by showing the dominant discourses coaches draw upon to engage in disciplinary practices. Mills and Denison ( 2013 , 2016 ) mapped how the physiology of endurance running influenced coaches’ use of strict work to rest ratios, minute and

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Andrew Hammond, Ruth Jeanes, Dawn Penney and Deana Leahy

that experiences of disability sport coaches raise “a number of important questions about the structure of ‘coach education,’ the role of the coach, the hierarchies within disabled sport, the impact of commodification on the disabled body and the (perceived) barriers to physical activity for disabled