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J.D. DeFreese, Travis E. Dorsch and Travis A. Flitton

). Laursen and Collins ( 2009 ) argue that researchers may gain a more distilled picture of the parent–child relationship by measuring perceptions of the relational markers of warmth and conflict. Warmth is the tendency for the parent–child relationship to be characterized by supportive, affectionate, and

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Larry Lauer, Daniel Gould, Nathan Roman and Marguerite Pierce

Junior tennis coaches commonly argue that parents must push their children and be very involved to develop their talent, despite the strain on the parent-child relationship that may occur from these tactics. To examine parental influence on talent development and the parent-child relationship, nine professional tennis players, eight parents, and eight coaches were retrospectively interviewed about each player’s junior development based Bloom’s three stages of talent development (1985). Results are presented through aggregated, nonfiction stories of three tennis development pathways: smooth, difficult, and turbulent. Smooth pathways were typical of parents who were supportive and maintained a healthy parent-child relationship while facilitating talent development. Difficult and turbulent pathways involved parents who stressed the importance of tennis and created pressure by pushing their child toward winning and talent development. For difficult pathways, parent-child relationships were negatively affected but conflicts were mostly resolved, whereas for turbulent pathways, many conflicts remained unresolved.

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Christopher M. Carr

This paper describes one psychologist’s professional journey providing clinical sport psychological services to student athletes, from training to first position, and on to current roles and responsibilities. Obstacles in providing psychological care to student-athletes in the intercollegiate setting are highlighted and an approach to overcoming these obstacles is articulated. Most importantly, this paper highlights the consequences of both interdisciplinary conflict within sport psychology and poorly trained professionals. The importance of ongoing professional development for both the individual practitioner and the field of sport psychology as a whole is thoroughly presented and discussed.

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Jim Taylor

This response to a case study focuses on how I would approach the development of an intervention program for Jenny. Such a program begins with extensive psychological and physical assessments. The psychological assessment would be garnered primarily through observation of Jenny at practice and in games, extensive interviewing of the athlete, and, with her permission, interviewing her coaches and parents. The physical assessment would involve testing of Jenny’s injured knee as well as a complete conditioning evaluation. The key issues that emerged as part of the conceptualization of Jenny’s Performance Dysfunction include: (a) family issues, including the internalizations of a perfectionistic father and a needy mother; (b) unresolved feelings related to her parents’ divorce; and (c) emotional immaturity that expresses itself in fear of failure, inappropriate emotions, and avoidance from conflict. The intervention would take a multimodal approach that involves: (a) insight; (b) emotional exploration; (c) behavioral change; and (d) mental skills. The program would conclude with a post-intervention assessment that would be comprised of objective evaluation of Jenny’s physical condition, coach feedback about Jenny’s behavior, and, finally, Jenny’s own assessment of changes that have occurred due to the intervention.

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Vaithehy Shanmugam, Sophia Jowett and Caroline Meyer

In the current study, we had two aims. First, we investigated the associations between eating psychopathology, situational interpersonal difficulties, and dispositional interpersonal difficulties among athletes and nonathletes. Second, we examined the mediating role of self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, and depression in these associations. A total of 152 athletes and 147 nonathletes completed self-report instruments pertaining to relationship quality with significant others, as well as social anxiety, loneliness, self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, depression, and eating psychopathology. Social anxiety and loneliness were found to be the only significant independent predictors of eating psychopathology among both athletes and nonathletes. However, such associations were indirectly mediated through depression for athletes and through self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, and depression for nonathletes. The findings of this study suggest that the psychosocial mechanisms involved in the eating psychopathology of athletes are relatively similar to that of nonathletes. Thus, it can be tentatively proposed that treatments and interventions that target reducing interpersonal conflicts currently available for the general population should also be offered to athletes.

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Fleur E.C.A. van Rens, Erika Borkoles, Damian Farrow and Remco C.J. Polman

assignments), the impact of sporting events and training on schoolwork and homework, extended absences from school to attend overseas events, restricted subject choice due to conflicts between assessments and sporting competitions, mental stress due to expectations imposed by self and others, sport related

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Laurel W. Sheffield and Lauren A. Stutts

students, men and women reported that they believed men were less likely to report pain than women ( Robinson et al., 2001 ). The Present Study There are conflicting results as to whether there is a difference between men and women in terms of likelihood of playing through pain and injury. For example

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Stine Nylandsted Jensen, Andreas Ivarsson, Johan Fallby and Anne-Marie Elbe

prevention of conflicts of interest in the prevention and fight against betting-related match fixing in the EU 28-final report . Den Haag, Netherlands : Asser Institute . Cohen , J.R. , Young , J.F. , Gibb , B.E. , Hankin , B.L. , & Abela , J.R. ( 2014 ). Why are anxiety and depressive symptoms

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Anne Holding, Jo-Annie Fortin, Joëlle Carpentier, Nora Hope and Richard Koestner

and control, following frequent conflicts with the coach, de-selection from the national team, or painful recurring injuries. This study investigated whether athletes retiring for autonomous reasons are more likely to psychologically “let go” of their former athletic career and adjust positively to

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Hayley Perelman, Joanna Buscemi, Elizabeth Dougherty and Alissa Haedt-Matt

differences in sports that promote leanness and sports that do not, conflicts within the literature make it clear that more research needs to be conducted regarding body dissatisfaction and sport type. In addition to differences in sex and sport type, athletes may differ in the experience of body