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Athanasios Mouratidis, Willy Lens and Maarten Vansteenkiste

We relied on self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000) to investigate to what extent autonomy-supporting corrective feedback (i.e., feedback that coaches communicate to their athletes after poor performance or mistakes) is associated with athletes’ optimal motivation and well-being. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional study with 337 (67.1% males) Greek adolescent athletes (age M = 15.59, SD = 2.37) from various sports. Aligned with SDT, we found through path analysis that an autonomy-supporting versus controlling communication style was positively related to future intentions to persist and well-being and negatively related to ill-being. These relations were partially mediated by the perceived legitimacy of the corrective feedback (i.e., the degree of acceptance of corrective feedback), and, in turn, by intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, and external regulation for doing sports. Results indicate that autonomy-supporting feedback can be still motivating even in cases in which such feedback conveys messages of still too low competence.

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Erica Pasquini and Melissa Thompson

research has confirmed that it is occurring in competitive youth sport ( Pasquini, Thompson, Gould, Speed, & Doan, 2019 ). More specifically, coaches of competitive youth soccer were shown to provide higher frequencies of general instruction, corrective feedback, and encouragement to their self

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Gert-Jan De Muynck, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Jochen Delrue, Nathalie Aelterman, Leen Haerens and Bart Soenens

, Soenens, & Lens, 2004 ). In the sport domain, correlational studies have shown that when athletes perceive their coach as relying on autonomy-supportive language when providing corrective feedback, they report greater feelings of positive affect and stronger intentions to persevere ( Mouratidis, Lens

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Nicolas Robin, Lucette Toussaint, Eric Joblet, Emmanuel Roublot and Guillaume R. Coudevylle

. , & Kourtessis , T. ( 2008 ). The effect of different corrective feedback methods on the outcome and self-confidence of young athletes . Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 7, 371 – 378 . PubMed ID: 24149905 . Veraksa , A. , & Gorovaya , A. ( 2012 ). Imagery training efficacy among novice

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Denver M.Y. Brown and Steven R. Bray

instructed to maintain the handgrip squeeze for as long as possible, keeping their force tracing line at, or slightly above, the target level and were given corrective feedback when the force dropped below the target level. The experimenter signaled the trial was complete when force fell below the 50% MVC

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Valérian Cece, Noémie Lienhart, Virginie Nicaise, Emma Guillet-Descas and Guillaume Martinent

). Charlotte, NC : Information Age Publishing . Mouratidis , A. , Lens , W. , & Vansteenkiste , M. ( 2010 ). How you provide corrective feedback makes a difference: The motivating role of communicating in an autonomy-supporting way . Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 32 , 619 – 637 . PubMed

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( p  = .028) in judo along with areas such as athletic ability ( p  = .034) and fitness ( p  = .003). Instructional strategies included verbal explanations combined with physical demonstrations, and a blocked practice style was utilized in conjunction with both reinforcing and corrective feedback. A

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Thelma S. Horn

athletes some choice in solutions, incorporate instructional and corrective feedback (rather than focusing on the person), and be paired with tips for improvement. Examination of the effectiveness of this form of feedback showed that athletes who received such feedback from their coaches exhibited higher

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Thelma S. Horn

than the product (e.g., gave corrective feedback in response to failures, emphasized mastery of tasks rather than outcome, encouraged students to determine their own strategies for success, exhibited a sense of shared responsibility for learning). Recent intervention studies in our kinesiology field

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Chad M. Killian, Christopher J. Kinder and Amelia Mays Woods

than previous exclusively in-class-designed games. Teacher could monitor student progress outside of class by commenting on the wikis; provided immediate positive and corrective feedback; added online interaction with students resulted in increased out-of-class workload; recommended only implementing