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Athanasios Mouratidis, Willy Lens and Maarten Vansteenkiste

We relied on self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000) to investigate to what extent autonomy-supporting corrective feedback (i.e., feedback that coaches communicate to their athletes after poor performance or mistakes) is associated with athletes’ optimal motivation and well-being. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional study with 337 (67.1% males) Greek adolescent athletes (age M = 15.59, SD = 2.37) from various sports. Aligned with SDT, we found through path analysis that an autonomy-supporting versus controlling communication style was positively related to future intentions to persist and well-being and negatively related to ill-being. These relations were partially mediated by the perceived legitimacy of the corrective feedback (i.e., the degree of acceptance of corrective feedback), and, in turn, by intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, and external regulation for doing sports. Results indicate that autonomy-supporting feedback can be still motivating even in cases in which such feedback conveys messages of still too low competence.

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William A. Sparrow, Alison J. Shinkfield, Ross H. Day, Sarah Hollitt and Damien Jolley

Recognizing a class of movements as belonging to a “nominal” action category, such as walking, running, or throwing, is a fundamental human ability. Three experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that common (“prototypical”) features of moving displays could be learned by observation. Participants viewed moving stick-figure displays resembling forearm flexion movements in the saggital plane. Four displays (presentation displays) were first presented in which one or more movement dimensions were combined with 2 respective cues: direction (up, down), speed (fast, slow), and extent (long, short). Eight test displays were then shown, and the observer indicated whether each test display was like or unlike those previously seen. The results showed that without corrective feedback, a single cue (e.g., up or down) could be correctly recognized, on average, with the proportion correct between .66 and .87. When two cues were manipulated (e.g., up and slow), recognition accuracy remained high, ranging between .72 and .89. Three-cue displays were also easily identified. These results provide the first empirical demonstration of action-prototype learning for categories of human action and show how apparently complex kinematic patterns can be categorized in terms of common features or cues. It was also shown that probability of correct recognition of kinematic properties was reduced when the set of 4 presentation displays were more variable with respect to their shared kinematic property, such as speed or amplitude. Finally, while not conclusive, the results (from 2 of the 3 experiments) did suggest that similarity (or “likeness”) with respect to a common kinematic property (or properties) is more easily recognized than dissimilarity.

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How You Provide Corrective Feedback Makes a Difference: The Motivating Role of Communicating in an Autonomy-Supporting Way Athanasios Mouratidis * Willy Lens * Maarten Vansteenkiste * 10 2010 32 5 619 637 10.1123/jsep.32.5.619 Developmental Activities That Contribute to High or Low Performance

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Gert-Jan De Muynck, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Jochen Delrue, Nathalie Aelterman, Leen Haerens and Bart Soenens

, Soenens, & Lens, 2004 ). In the sport domain, correlational studies have shown that when athletes perceive their coach as relying on autonomy-supportive language when providing corrective feedback, they report greater feelings of positive affect and stronger intentions to persevere ( Mouratidis, Lens

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Denver M.Y. Brown and Steven R. Bray

instructed to maintain the handgrip squeeze for as long as possible, keeping their force tracing line at, or slightly above, the target level and were given corrective feedback when the force dropped below the target level. The experimenter signaled the trial was complete when force fell below the 50% MVC

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Valérian Cece, Noémie Lienhart, Virginie Nicaise, Emma Guillet-Descas and Guillaume Martinent

). Charlotte, NC : Information Age Publishing . Mouratidis , A. , Lens , W. , & Vansteenkiste , M. ( 2010 ). How you provide corrective feedback makes a difference: The motivating role of communicating in an autonomy-supporting way . Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 32 , 619 – 637 . PubMed

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( p  = .028) in judo along with areas such as athletic ability ( p  = .034) and fitness ( p  = .003). Instructional strategies included verbal explanations combined with physical demonstrations, and a blocked practice style was utilized in conjunction with both reinforcing and corrective feedback. A

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Thelma S. Horn

athletes some choice in solutions, incorporate instructional and corrective feedback (rather than focusing on the person), and be paired with tips for improvement. Examination of the effectiveness of this form of feedback showed that athletes who received such feedback from their coaches exhibited higher

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Thelma S. Horn

than the product (e.g., gave corrective feedback in response to failures, emphasized mastery of tasks rather than outcome, encouraged students to determine their own strategies for success, exhibited a sense of shared responsibility for learning). Recent intervention studies in our kinesiology field

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Nicolas Robin, Lucette Toussaint, Eric Joblet, Emmanuel Roublot and Guillaume R. Coudevylle

.2466/pms.102.1.275-284 Tzetzis , G. , Votsis , E. , & Kourtessis , T. ( 2008 ). The effect of different corrective feedback methods on the outcome and self-confidence of young athletes . Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 7, 371 – 378 . PubMed ID: 24149905. Veraksa , A. , & Gorovaya , A