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Lucie Thibault

The purpose of the 2008 Earle F. Zeigler Lecture was to highlight some of the issues involved in the globalization of sport that affect the field of sport management. In particular, four issues were presented: a division of labor undertaken on an international scale where transnational corporations are drawing on developing countries’ work forces to manufacture sportswear and sport equipment; the increasing flow of athletes where country of birth and origin are no longer a limitation on where an athlete plays and competes; the increased involvement of global media conglomerates in sport; and the impact of sport on the environment. The impact and inconvenient truths of these issues on sport management were addressed.

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Danny O’Brien and Jess Ponting

This research analyzes a strategic approach to managing surf tourism in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Surf tourists travel to often remote destinations for the purpose of riding surfboards, and earlier research suggests the mismanagement of surf tourism in some destinations has resulted in significant deleterious impacts on host communities. The research question in this study addresses how surf tourism can be managed to achieve sustainable host community benefits in the context of a developing country. Primary data came from semistructured interviews and participant observation. The findings demonstrate how sport governing bodies can engage host communities in a collaborative framework for the sustainable utilization of sport tourism resources. The derived knowledge from this research may decrease host communities’ reliance on less sustainable commercial activities, and inform policy and practice on sustainable approaches to using sport tourism for community building and poverty alleviation.

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Carrie W. LeCrom, Brendan Dwyer and Gregory Greenhalgh

. Thompson , K. , Boore , J. , & Deeny , P. ( 2000 ). A comparison of an international experience for nursing students in developed and developing countries . International Journal of Nursing Studies, 37 ( 6 ), 481 – 492 . PubMed ID: 10871658 doi:10.1016/S0020-7489(00)00027-4 10.1016/S0020

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Alex C. Gang

economies as the book’s editors and authors delve into the past, present, and future of the environment encompassing each domestic sport market. The editors’ and contributing authors’ understanding of a leading economy is not confined to the traditional conception of developed countries mostly located in

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Claudio M. Rocha

seem to be present in developing countries, during the bid competition (2007–2009), the international economic scenario was favorable to Brazil. In 2008, the most recent global economic crisis erupted, hitting harder in the United States and Europe. A group of developing countries—the BRICs (Brazil

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Kelsey Slater

midlevel developing country to becoming a world power. All of that is fantasy; none of it is true. What is true about it is that each of these countries had deficient resources, and it was more expensive for them to do these things. Because first of all they didn’t have as many of the facilities that

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Chen Chen and Daniel S. Mason

needed in the local context: “Many experts believe that communities – particularly those in developing countries – cannot function autonomously without the guidance and help of skilled ‘change agents’, which support and teach them how to cooperate and use their capacities effectively . . .” ( Schulenkorf

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Jonathan A. Jensen and T. Bettina Cornwell

global sponsorship. There has been a trend toward awarding MSEs to developing countries ( Cuervo-Cazurra & Genc, 2008 ) such as the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) economies, with some discussion of the role that sponsors and their markets play in decision-making ( Humphreys

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Chen Chen and Daniel S. Mason

simultaneously with the diffusion of sport for development and sport for development and peace programs in a variety of contexts worldwide, including developed countries ( Lyras & Welty Peachey, 2011 ; Schulenkorf, Sherry, & Rowe, 2016 ; Schulenkorf & Spaaij, 2016 ; Sherry, Schulenkorf, & Chalip, 2015

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Jeffrey W. Kassing

their kit, FCB initiated a partnership with UNICEF that annually provided 1.5 million Euros in support of the agency devoted to improving the lives of children in developing countries. The arrangement also placed the UNICEF logo on the jersey where a corporate sponsorship might be (i.e., front and