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Cal Botterill

This article describes the features and characteristics of a 3-year involvement of SportPsych consulting in professional hockey from 1987 to 1990. Primarily discussion revolves around a 2-year development program with the Chicago Blackhawks. The components of an educational interdisciplinary philosophy of mental skills development and application are outlined and some of the challenges involved in professional team sport are discussed. The range of services described includes involvement in training camp, game preparation, individual development, subgroup work, team meetings, staff development, family support, minor pro development, playoffs, off-season programming, and scouting. The importance of a primary responsibility to players is pointed out, along with some of the advantages and disadvantages of a part-time role. Discussion covers some of the challenges faced and the potential effectiveness of various interventions and services.

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Kate L. Pumpa, Sharon M. Madigan, Ruth E. Wood-Martin, Richelle Flanagan and Noreen Roche

The use of sport supplements presents a dilemma for many of those involved in supporting athletes, including coaches, families, support staff, and the athletes themselves. Often the information that they source can be incorrect and promote a biased view regarding the use of nutritional supplements. The aim of this case study was to describe the process that occurred around the development of a series of targeted educational fact sheets on a range of nutritional supplements for Irish athletes. It describes the initiation and support of the process by the Irish Sports Council; one of its subgroups, the Food and Food Supplements Committee; and the Irish Institute of Sport. A needs assessment through questionnaires was carried out to establish the most commonly used sport nutrition supplements by athletes age 16 or over in Ireland. Respondents completed 105 questionnaires over a 4-mo period in 2008–09 that led to the production of 20 supplement fact sheets. These supplement fact sheets will enable Irish athletes to access high-quality, up-to-date, scientific information about the supplements they have reported consuming. Since personal reading had a strong influence over athletes’ decision-making process for taking nutritional supplements, as did scientific research, fact sheets available on the Internet from a reliable source are an ideal way to educate Irish athletes.

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Meredith George and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

parents’ support of their children’s physical activity . American Journal of Health Promotion, 23 ( 5 ), 315 – 319 . PubMed doi:10.4278/ajhp.071119122 10.4278/ajhp.071119122 Dowda , M. , Dishman , R.K. , Pfeiffer , K.A. , & Pate , R.R. ( 2007 ). Family support for physical activity in girls

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Chelsee A. Shortt, Collin A. Webster, Richard J. Keegan, Cate A. Egan and Ali S. Brian

highlighted the role of the provider and curricula in supporting PL. Closed-ended responses indicated there was no agreement about “family support,” “community support,” “external accountability,” and “peer groups” as outside agents that could contribute to PL (see Table  2 ). The second subtheme

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Paul E. Yeatts, Ronald Davis, Jun Oh and Gwang-Yon Hwang

. Guttmann’s seminal work, the Warrior Games was created to address the environment of competition, camaraderie, and family support, which in turn promotes opportunities for growth and achievement and suggests improved psychological well-being ( https://dodwarriorgames.com ). Team compositions consist of

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Karin Lobenius-Palmér, Birgitta Sjöqvist, Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf and Lars-Olov Lundqvist

disabilities aged 7–20 years. Participants Participants were recruited from the Child and Youth Habilitation Centre (CYHC), Region Örebro County, Sweden. CYHC provides community-based rehabilitation and family support services for youth (aged 0–20 years) with various disabilities. All youth with disabilities