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J. Thomas Yokum, Juan J. Gonzalez and Tom Badgett

We are interested in forecasting or predicting the long-term viability of a minor league baseball team. The research question is whether this minor league team will be successful in attracting attendance over an extended period of time. An important financial issue is if the team is predicted to fail, then exactly how long will it last? A variety of methods are used in a step-by-step procedure to evaluate this viability. We first test whether attendance is evolving or stable through a unit root test, a test of market persistence. We then use the Bass model to assess whether the projected product life cycle is turning up or down. The Gompertz and logistic (Pearl) diffusion curves are next applied to home stand data of various lengths in order to make forecasts of an eventual dissolution point at which the team would financially collapse. Market saturation is not estimated, but set at the stadium capacity. Forecasting principles involving diffusion models are implemented. Analogies are used as a complementary forecasting technique to assess whether there is long-term potential for survival. Finally, logistic regression on cross-sectional data is used to supplement the forecasts. The results of the triangulation of diffusion curves, analogies, and logistic regression predict a decline in the minor league team’s ability to capture attendance.

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Daniel Rascher and Heather Rascher

An examination of possible expansion or relocation sites for the NBA is undertaken using a two-equation system requiring two-stage probit least squares to estimate. The location model forecasts the best cities for an NBA team based on the underlying characteristics of current NBA teams. The results suggest that Louisville, San Diego, Baltimore, St. Louis, and Norfolk appear to be the most promising candidates for relocation or expansion.

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Jacquelyn Cuneen and Ray Schneider

Sports, Inc., a popular 1980s-era sport business weekly, addressed eight elements of sports business/management in a January 2,1989 issue entitled “Sports in the 90's: The Spiral Goes On.” The Sports, Inc. issue provided selected writers a forum in which to disseminate their practical forecasts for 1990s sport enterprise. This special issue of the Journal of Sport Management provides established and/or rising scholars with a forum to reflect on several of Sports, Inc.'s predictions and share their own scholarly assessments of sport's past and current business and managerial status.

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Michael Milano and Packianathan Chelladurai

With a view of verifying the optimistic forecasts of the growth of the sport industry, the paper presents an estimate of the size of the sport industry in 2005 and compares it to a 1995 estimate provided by Meek (1997). Following the methodology of Meek and the guidelines put forth by the United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis (2007), we present three estimates for the size of the Gross Domestic Sport Product (GDSP) of the United States of America in 2005—conservative estimate of $168.469 billion, moderate estimate of $189.338 billion, and the liberal estimate of $207.503 billion. A comparison of the moderate estimate with Meek’s 1995 estimate shows that the size of sport industry, in relative terms, actually declined. The sources of the data, rationale for three different estimates, and the values for the components of the GDSP are described and explained.

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Brian P. Soebbing, Pamela Wicker and Daniel Weimar

Previous research has examined the effect of changes in upper management positions on actual organizational performance; however, the influence of leadership changes on performance expectations has been largely neglected. This gap in the literature is surprising given that failure to meet expectations leads to dismissal. The purpose of the present research is to analyze how coaching changes affect expectations of a sports team’s performance. Betting lines are used as performance expectations because they are unbiased forecasts of game outcomes. This study uses data from 13 seasons of the German Football Bundesliga. Significant positive timelagged effects on performance expectations are evident when examining underlying expected performance. These positive effects are evident 8 weeks after the leadership change, indicating that new leaders are expected to need some time before significant performance improvements are expected to occur.

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Rebecca Olive

for waves to come, post-surf hang outs in cafes, carpark battles, and hours spent checking weather forecasts. In this way, the book focuses on the smallest part of the sport—the spectacle of wave-riding over the banality of everyday surfing interactions. Like all cultures, surfing tends to do a lot of

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Shelley Lucas

in the Red Zinger/Coors Classic: Where It All Began DVD set, clearly constructed the men’s race as the centerpiece. The DVD packaging forecasts this focus on the men’s race through the brief descriptions of each year’s coverage. Short “teaser” descriptions are provided for eleven of the twelve

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Andrew Hammond, Ruth Jeanes, Dawn Penney and Deana Leahy

. Furthermore, Richer et al. ( 1992 ) forecasted that the shift towards functional classification in swimming would make the sport more commercially viable (such as through the selling of television rights), and alleviate spectator confusion about multiple events, but that this would come at the expense of

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Stefan Szymanski

revolutionizing many aspects of life. 1 Big Data is at play in a wide variety of applications, from genomics research (e.g.,  Costa, 2012 ), which enables us to find new solutions to longstanding puzzles in medicine, to businesses that can track your every purchase, forecast the products you are mostly like to

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Annemarie Farrell

begin with an historical look at data collection and analysis, highlighting sabermetrics and the overall direction of data forecasting and evidence-based decision making. A chapter offered later in this section examines best practices in social-media analytics, focusing on Twitter and the 2013 Tour de