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Owen Spendiff and Ian G. Campbell

Eight men with spinal cord injury ingested glucose (CHO) or placebo (PLA) 20-min prior to exercise. Participants performed arm crank ergometry for one-hour at 65% V̇O2peak, followed by a 20-min performance test in which athletes were asked to achieve their greatest possible distance. Physiological responses during the one-hour tests were similar between CHO and PLA trials. At the onset of exercise, the CHO trial blood glucose concentrations were higher than PLA (p < .05) but returned to resting values after 20-min exercise. Respiratory exchange ratio responses during the CHO trial were indicative of a higher rate of CHO oxidation (p < .05). A greater distance (km) was covered in the 20-min performance tests after CHO ingestion (p < .05). Results show preingestion of glucose improves endurance performance of wheelchair athletes.

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Gregory R. Waryasz

Edited by Kathleen M. Laquale

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Joshua T. Slysz and Jamie F. Burr

-body glucose metabolism, 1 lipid oxidation, 2 and is one of the greatest modifiable contributors to the resting metabolic rate. 3 The maintenance of skeletal muscle becomes increasingly important with advancing age, as low levels of muscle mass are strongly correlated with a loss of independence, mobility

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Janelle Prince, Eric Schussler and Ryan McCann

, which includes excitatory neurotransmitter release, abnormal ion fluxes, increased glucose metabolism, lactic acid accumulation, elevated cerebral blood flow, energy deficit, and inflammation. 3 – 5 These changes in the brain are responsible for the hallmark symptoms of a concussion, such as headache

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Ben J. Lee and Charles Douglas Thake

altitude: carbohydrate utilization during exercise at 4,300 m . J Appl Physiol . 2000 ; 88 ( 1 ): 246 – 256 . PubMed 10.1152/jappl.2000.88.1.246 10642387 16. Brooks G , Butterfield G , Wolfe R , et al . Increased dependence on blood glucose after acclimatization to 4,300 m . J Appl Physiol

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Kelly A. Brock, Lindsey E. Eberman, Richard H. Laird IV, David J. Elmer and Kenneth E. Games

in muscle recovery postexercise by speeding clearance of blood lactate, 22 whereas others have refuted its capacity for quick clearance of blood lactate 14 , 23 and found no changes in glycogen resynthesis, insulin, or blood glucose between intervention and passive recovery. 14 Researchers have

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Bailey Peck, Timothy Renzi, Hannah Peach, Jane Gaultney and Joseph S. Marino

on a student-athlete’s academic performance. The academic and health consequences of untreated SDB have been clearly demonstrated. Poor academic progress, glucose intolerance, and hypertension have all been associated with SDB, 29 – 31 which further emphasizes the need for empirical evidence

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Owen Spendiff and Ian G. Campbell

Seven athletes with low lesion paraplegia ingested a 7.6% 648ml glucose drink using two schedules of ingestion (4 × 162 ml per 20 min & 2 × 324 ml per 60 min) in a crossover design. Participants exercised at 65% peak oxygen uptake for one hour, followed by a 20-minute performance test. The cardiorespiratory responses during the one-hour tests were similar between trials. Plasma glucose concentrations significantly increased after ingestion and remained stable during the 162 trial, but reduced over time during the 324 trial. Free fatty acid concentrations increased for both trials but increased significantly more during the 324 trial. The results of this study suggest that the ingestion of glucose during exercise is the best strategy for wheelchair athletes competing in endurance events.

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Jill Pawlowski, E. Andrew Pitchford, Daniel W. Tindall and Seo Hee Lee

Edited by ZáNean McClain

participants and their parents/legal guardians at a time. No difference in body mass index, waist circumference, glucose, and triglycerides was seen between groups or across the intervention. The intervention group saw an increase in high-density lipoprotein and decrease in low-density lipoprotein and total

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Soubhagyalaxmi Mohanty, Balaram Pradhan and Alex Hankey

.4.1328-1336 Angadi , P. , Jagannathan , A. , Thulasi , A. , Kumar , V. , Umamaheshwar , K. , & Raghuram , N. ( 2017 ). Adherence to yoga and its resultant effects on blood glucose in Type 2 diabetes: A community-based follow-up study . International Journal of Yoga, 10 ( 1 ), 29 – 36 . PubMed ID