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Karen Lux Gaudreault, K. Andrew R. Richards, Kelly Simonton and Angela Simonton

graduate programs, particularly at the master’s degree level, is limited. That research which does exist highlights the potential for master’s degrees to both support the development of more innovative orientations among in-service teachers ( O’Bryant et al., 2000 ) and to help others feel more prepared

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Judy L. Van Raalte, Terry D. Brown, Britton W. Brewer, Joshua B. Avondoglio, Whitney M. Hartmann and Carrie B. Scherzer

The purpose of this research was to compile and evaluate the course offerings of sport psychology graduate programs with regard to the requirements for becoming a Certified Consultant, Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP). Course offerings of 79 programs were identified via the on-line version of the College Catalogue Collections of the Career Guidance Foundation. Course descriptions in physical education/exereise science and psychology departments were examined to determine whether they fell within the AAASP certification criteria areas. Most of the schools evaluated did not offer courses in all 12 areas required for AAASP certification. Several programs offered courses in as few as six of the required areas. The results of this study suggest that the majority of graduate programs in applied sport psychology do not offer the necessary courses for students interested in pursuing AAASP certification.

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Mark B. Andersen, Judy L. Van Raalte and Britton W. Brewer

To assess the supervisory skills of sport psychologists who are training future practitioners, the Sport Psychology Supervisory Skills Inventory (SPSSI) was mailed to 201 potential applied sport psychology supervisors. Supervisors were associated with graduate programs that offered applied sport psychology practica and/or internships, as identified in the Directory of Graduate Programs in Applied Sport Psychology (Sachs, Burke, & Salitsky, 1992). Supervisors rated themselves on 41 supervisory skills. The SPSSI was also mailed to 416 student members of AAASP, who were asked to rate their supervisors. There was a 35% return rate from supervisors and a 45% return rate from students. The findings suggest that supervised experience with athletes is limited for both supervisors and graduate students.

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Mark B. Andersen, Tim Aldridge, Jean M. Williams and Jim Taylor

This study expanded the work of Waite and Pettit (1993) and contacted 75 graduate programs for lists of names and addresses of students who graduated between 1989 and 1994 (N = 731). Doctoral (n = 92) and master (n = 162) graduates completed a tracking survey (modified from Waite & Pettit), reporting their demographics, educational backgrounds, current positions, incomes, initial and future career goals, and supervised experiences. The majority of doctoral graduates have found positions in academia/research, and most of the master graduates were in some sport or sport psychology-related job. The majority of the master and doctoral graduates, however, reported that finding paying sport psychology work was difficult, and many expressed at least moderate levels of frustration with the progress of their sport psychology careers. The information from this study could be useful for advising current and potential graduate students about career options after graduation.

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Mark B. Andersen and Brian T. Williams-Rice

Supervision plays a central role in the training of sport psychologists, but little discussion of what constitutes adequate supervision of trainees and practitioners is available in the applied sport psychology literature. Broader issues of supervision, such as the training of students to become supervisors, metasupervision, and career-long collegial supervision are rarely discussed. This paper will present models of general supervision processes from training the neophyte to collegial supervision, derived primarily from clinical and counseling psychology. Included are supervising the delivery of performance-enhancement services, identifying trainee and client needs, helping the student understand transference and countertransference phenomena, and suggestions for examining the relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee. Suggestions for improving supervision include course work and/or practica in supervision processes for applied sport psychology graduate programs along with continuing education workshops at sport psychology conferences.

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Daniel M. Landers

From 1950 to 1980, the field of sport psychology made significant strides. The developments were so rapid and so profound that this period can be called the “formative” years of the field. There was a tremendous expansion of the sport psychology literature, some of which constituted sustained contributions on a single research topic. Several textbooks and specialty books were published during this time period. Sport psychology journal articles expanded so much that journals devoted entirely to sport psychology research were created. The first graduate programs and research societies that focused more directly on sport psychology were also established. Applied sport psychology techniques, such as relaxation, imagery, and concentration training, were developed and made available to athletes. In addition to providing a description of the above-mentioned developments, some insights into dominant research methodology trends will be presented for the time periods of 1950 to 1965 and from 1966 to 1980.

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John M. Dunn

An historical view of the life and contributions of Hollis Francis Fait to the field of special physical education is presented in this article. Dr. Fait’s childhood, education, and early career are explored as well as his success in developing at the University of Connecticut one of the first graduate programs to train physical educators to work with the handicapped. Dr. Fait’s perspectives on athletics, administration, minorities, and scholarship are described. His belief in the need for concise language and clarity of thought demonstrated in his own scholarship is discussed.

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Janaina Lima Fogaca, Sam J. Zizzi and Mark B. Andersen

investigate SDC development, Tod et al. ( 2007 ) interviewed 16 students and 11 faculty of four sport psychology graduate programs in Australia about their views on what affected the development of students’ SDC. Their findings indicated that participants viewed their interactions with athletes, supervision

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Karen Lux Gaudreault, Kelly L. Simonton and Angela Simonton

along the three phases of acculturation, professional socialization, and organizational socialization. Recently, however, the model has been extended to include socialization in graduate programs and in the PETE faculty role ( Russell et al., 2016 ). Initial Socialization into Physical Education The

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Thomas J. Templin, Kim C. Graber and K. Andrew R. Richards

University of Massachusetts at Amherst, for example, insufficient undergraduate student enrollment and limited resources to support the underenrolled undergraduate program were the precursors to closure of the graduate program ( Blankenship & Templin, 2016 ). Program closures at research universities have