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Lee N. Burkett, Joana Ziuraitis and Wayne T. Phillips

The effectiveness of two specific and two non-specific warm-ups on the vertical jump test for female athletes was the focus of this research. The four warm-up procedures were: (a) weighted jumping (WT), (b) submaximal vertical jumping (SUB), (c) stretching (ST), and (d) no warm-up (NW). To control for learning and fatigue, a counter-balanced design was used to test all participants over four different days. Thus all groups were tested in a predetermined order. Participants were 15 university female athletes (age 18 to 23 years). After warming up using one of the four warm-up procedures, three vertical jumps were measured and the best score was used for analysis. A single factors repeated measure analysis of variance and LSD post hoc tests revealed that the weighted jump warm-up procedure was statistically superior (p<0.01) to all other warm-up procedures. No warm-up was statistically inferior to all other warm-ups and submaximal vertical jumping was not statistically different than stretching. It was concluded; (a) performing a warmup is better than no warm-up, and (b) utilizing a weighted resistance-jumping warm-up will produce the highest scores when performing the vertical jump test for female athletes.

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Trynke Hoekstra, Colin A. Boreham, Liam J. Murray and Jos W.R. Twisk

Background:

It is not clear what the relative contribution is of specific components of physical fitness (aerobic and muscular) to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We investigated associations between aerobic fitness (endurance) and muscular fitness (power) and CVD risk factors.

Methods:

Data were obtained from the Young Hearts project, a representative sample of 12- and 15-year-old boys and girls from Northern Ireland (N = 2016). Aerobic fitness was determined by the 20-m shuttle run test, muscular fitness by the Sargent jump test. CVD risk factors included sum of skinfolds, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, and TC:HDL ratio. Several linear regression analyses were conducted for 4 age and gender groups separately, with the risk factor as the outcome variable.

Results:

Significant associations between aerobic fitness and a healthy CVD risk profile were found. These observed relationships were independent of power, whereas the (few) relationships between muscular fitness and the risk factors were partly explained by endurance.

Conclusions:

Tailored, preventive strategies during adolescence, incorporating endurance rather than power sports, could be encouraged to help prevent CVD. This is important because existing studies propose that healthiness during adulthood is founded on healthiness in adolescence.

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Stephen Harvey, Chris Rissel and Mirjam Pijnappels

, a vertical jump test was used ( de Ruiter, de Korte, Schreven, & de Haan, 2010 ). This jump can be described as a countermovement jump. Each subject was fitted with an adjustable belt with a retractable tailor’s tape fixed to it. The tape was then rolled out to the ground, and this provided the 0 cm

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Kelsey Dow, Robert Pritchett, Karen Roemer and Kelly Pritchett

exercise performance (vertical jump test [standing and with an approach], L-run agility test, and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1), (2) subjective measures of recovery, and (3) rehydration measures in female athletes. Methods Participants Participants included female athletes ( n  = 10

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Jennifer J. Sherwood, Cathy Inouye, Shannon L. Webb and Jenny O

, two-legged jump ( Davies & Jones, 1993 ), but challenges exist when using this measure in older adults. Although the vertical jump is a functional movement, a maximal jumping test may have serious adverse effects in participants with osteoporosis, degenerative disc disease, or osteoarthritis

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Matti Hyvärinen, Sarianna Sipilä, Janne Kulmala, Harto Hakonen, Tuija H. Tammelin, Urho M. Kujala, Vuokko Kovanen and Eija K. Laakkonen

Performance Tests A set of laboratory measurements including a 6-min walk test (6MWT), maximal isometric knee extension test (KE), vertical jump test (VJ), and maximal isometric hand grip test (GF) to assess cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness were performed during the laboratory visit. However, some

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Jakob Tarp, Anna Bugge, Niels Christian Møller, Heidi Klakk, Christina Trifonov Rexen, Anders Grøntved and Niels Wedderkopp

attempts on an analogue handgrip dynamometer (Smedley’s dynamometer; Scandidact, Odder, Denmark) while standing. The dynamometer was adjusted to hand size. The result was divided by body weight for analysis. 20 Muscular power was measured by a vertical jump test as the highest vertical displacement (in

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Rose M. Angell, Stephen A. Butterfield, Shihfen Tu, E. Michael Loovis, Craig A. Mason and Christopher J. Nightingale

mechanical adjustments or postural alterations (i.e., transporting one’s body mass; see Sporiš et al., 2014 ; Yusof et al., 2013 ). Therefore, studies using hopping and jumping tests often produce significant differences between those with high BMI scores and their peers with normal weight. This is

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Feng-Tzu Chen, Su-Ru Chen, I-Hua Chu, Jen-Hao Liu and Yu-Kai Chang

was measured using the sit-and-reach test, in which the given participant would sit on the floor and then extend his or her hands as far as possible toward his or her feet in order to determine the participant’s lower back and hamstring flexibility. Power was assessed using the vertical jump test

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especially in jump test, push-up and motor quotient. Among girls’, late one sport participants had lower scores in push-up and moving sideways. Results from this study showed that among boys participating to several sports and early involvement in organized sports were related to higher performance in