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Logan A. Lucas, Benjamin S. England, Travis W. Mason, Christopher R. Lanning, Taylor M. Miller, Alexander M. Morgan and Thomas Gus Almonroeder

exceeding a load that could result in injury. 19 , 20 The primary purpose of this study was to compare impact accelerations during unplanned versus preplanned lateral cutting. We hypothesized that impact accelerations would be higher and that there would be greater intertrial variability when individuals

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Timothy A. Hanke, Bruce Kay, Michael Turvey and David Tiberio

well as a commonly employed tactic for bodily protection when faced with real or perceived threats to balance ( Pai, Maki, Iqbal, McIlroy, & Perry, 2000 ; Pai, Rogers, Patton, Cain, & Hanke, 1998 ). Postural adjustments (PAs) associated with lateral weight transfer necessary to unload the stepping

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Noah X. Tocci, David R. Howell, Dai Sugimoto, Corey Dawkins, Amy Whited and Donald Bae

, the purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of pitch mechanics on peak elbow varus torque in healthy youth pitchers. We hypothesized that less lateral pelvic tilt and shorter stride lengths would increase peak elbow varus torque. Methods A total of 18 male pitchers participated in

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Guillaume Mornieux, Elmar Weltin, Monika Pauls, Franz Rott and Albert Gollhofer

Lateral movements with changes of direction are common in many team sports such as soccer or handball. During cutting maneuvers, the athlete performs a complex dynamic task by quickly changing their direction of movement while securing their balance. Knee joint control is an essential requirement

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Yuichiro Okushima, Nobutoshi Yamazaki, Morio Matsumoto, Kazuhiro Chiba, Takeo Nagura and Yoshiaki Toyama

A biomechanical study of lateral translation in lumbar spine with human cadavers was performed in order to explore the direction of the force increasing lateral translation and the contributions of discs and facet joints to lateral translation. Whole lumbar spines from 12 fresh cadavers were attached to a specially designed loading apparatus whose five cables simulated the muscles of the trunk without restricting natural movement. Three-dimensional positions of each vertebra were recorded with position-sensitive detectors. Force in the anterolateral direction increased the lateral translation more than force in the posterolateral direction. Lateral translation was increased to a significantly greater extent when the facet joints were removed than when the discs were removed at L4-5 at the levels of shear loading applied in this study.

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Bradley J. Monteleone, Janet L. Ronsky, Willem H. Meeuwisse and Ronald F. Zernicke

Ankle function is frequently measured using static or dynamic tasks in normal and injured patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel task to quantify ankle dynamics and muscle activity in normal subjects. Twelve subjects with no prior ankle injuries participated. Video motion analysis cameras, force platforms, and an EMG system were used to collect data during a lateral hop movement task that consisted of multiple lateral-medial hops over an obstacle. Mean (SD) inversion ankle position at contact was 4.4° (4.0) in the medial direction and –3.5° (4.4) in the lateral direction; mean (SD) tibialis anterior normalized muscle activity was 0.11 (0.08) in the medial direction and 0.16 (0.13) in the lateral direction. The lateral hop movement was shown to be an effective task for quantifying ankle kinematics, forces, moments, and muscle activities in normal subjects. Future applications will use the lateral hop movement to assess subjects with previous ankle injuries in laboratory and clinical settings.

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Taija Finni and Sulin Cheng

The positions of EMG electrodes over the knee extensor muscles were examined in 19 healthy men using MR images; electrodes were placed according to the SENIAM (surface electromyography for non-invasive assessment of muscles) guidelines. From axial images, the medial and lateral borders of the muscles were identified, and the arc length of the muscle surface was measured. The electrode location was expressed as a percentage value from the muscle’s medial border. EMGs were recorded during isometric maximal contraction, squat jumps, and countermovement jumps and analyzed for cross-correlation. The results showed that variations in lateral positioning were greatest in vastus medialis (47% SD 11) and rectus femoris (68% SD 15). In vastus lateralis, the electrode was usually placed close to the rectus femoris (19% SD 6). The peak cross-correlation coefficient varied between 0.15 and 0.68, but was not associated with electrode location. It is recommended that careful consideration is given to the medial-lateral positioning of the vastus lateralis electrodes especially, so that the electrodes are positioned over the mid-muscle rather than in close proximity to rectus femoris.

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Erwin E.H. van Wegen, Richard E.A. van Emmerik, Robert C. Wagenaar and Terry Ellis

Postural instability is a major problem in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined balance control in PD by using center of pressure (CP) variability and time-to-contact to investigate boundary relevant postural control behavior under quiet stance leaning conditions. Postural orientation was manipulated by having patients (n = 10) and healthy older controls (n = 7)lean Forward and backward with varying degrees of lean on a force platform. The subjects were instructed to lean forward or backward (either halfway or as far as possible) without bending their hips or lifting their heels or toes off the ground. Time-to-contact of the CP with the geometric stability boundary defined by the feet as well as CP position and variability were analyzed. Mediolateral CP variability was increased in the patients with PD. Medio-lateral average time-to-contact was decreased in the patients but not so in the antcrior-posterior direction. In contrast to the CP variability, the medio-lateral variability of time-lo-contact was lower in the patients. Patients as well as healthy older controls responded to lean manipulations with an increase in CP variability. Boundary relevant CP measures thus show clear changes in control strategies and confirm the role of lateral instability in PD.

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Ken Tokunaga, Yuki Nakai, Ryo Matsumoto, Ryoji Kiyama, Masayuki Kawada, Akihiko Ohwatashi, Kiyohiro Fukudome, Tadasu Ohshige and Tetsuo Maeda

This study evaluated the effect of foot progression angle on the reduction in knee adduction moment caused by a lateral wedged insole during walking. Twenty healthy, young volunteers walked 10 m at their comfortable velocity wearing a lateral wedged insole or control flat insole in 3 foot progression angle conditions: natural, toe-out, and toe-in. A 3-dimensional rigid link model was used to calculate the external knee adduction moment, the moment arm of ground reaction force to knee joint center, and the reduction ratio of knee adduction moment and moment arm. The result indicated that the toe-out condition and lateral wedged insole decreased the knee adduction moment in the whole stance phase. The reduction ratio of the knee adduction moment and the moment arm exhibited a close relationship. Lateral wedged insoles decreased the knee adduction moment in various foot progression angle conditions due to decrease of the moment arm of the ground reaction force. Moreover, the knee adduction moment during the toe-out gait with lateral wedged insole was the smallest due to the synergistic effect of the lateral wedged insole and foot progression angle. Lateral wedged insoles may be a valid intervention for patients with knee osteoarthritis regardless of the foot progression angle.

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Yuki Uto, Tetsuo Maeda, Ryoji Kiyama, Masayuki Kawada, Ken Tokunaga, Akihiko Ohwatashi, Kiyohiro Fukudome, Tadasu Ohshige, Yoichi Yoshimoto and Kazunori Yone

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.