Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • "life skills" x
  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
Clear All
Restricted access

Rachel Allison

contributes to women’s academic and career achievement outcomes ( Coakley, 2011 ; Troutman & Dufur, 2007 ). The prevailing explanation for the supposedly positive effects of sports participation is a “developmental theory” ( Zeiser, 2011 , p. 1143) that sport improves life skills such as time management

Restricted access

Jennifer J. Waldron

There has been a growing trend in examining how life skills can be developed through sport programs (Danish, 2002). Four components of life skills central to the current study were interpersonal communication, problem solving, health maintenance, and identity development (Darden & Gazda, 1996). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of participation in Girls on Track (GOT), a sport-based life-skills program, to the effects of participation in soccer programs and the Girl Scouts. The GOT program is a running program intended to teach girls physical, personal, and social skills. Nineteen girls from the three programs were interviewed individually. Results revealed that all four components of life skills emerged from the interviews with GOT participants. In comparison, only three components emerged for the other two programs. These data suggest that the GOT program may be more successful in delivering life skills compared to the soccer and Girl Scouts programs.

Restricted access

Stéphanie Turgeon, Kelsey Kendellen, Sara Kramers, Scott Rathwell and Martin Camiré

). Thus, because of its school affiliation and developmental mandate, North American high school sport is ideally positioned as an arena for life-skills development. The Mission Statements of High School Sport–Governing Bodies In both Canada and the United States, high school sports are governed at the

Restricted access

Dawn Anderson-Butcher

implementation of youth sport to promote positive social outcomes. The first approach focuses on the contribution of youth sport to social- and/or life-skill development. The second explores the value of youth sport for addressing broader social problems. I highlight evidence-based strategies essential to both

Restricted access

Shawn D. Forde

HIV/AIDS education and prevention are often described as one way that SDP can contribute to international development, yet there has been little critical analysis of how discourses legitimize particular conceptions of HIV/AIDS and constructions of life skills. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to conduct a critical discourse analysis, guided by the concept of biopedagogies, of the Live Safe Play Safe (LSPS) manual that Right to Play (RTP) has used to train facilitators for its HIV/AIDS prevention program. The findings demonstrate that discourses of risk, individualism, and deficiency constructed life skills in a way that aligned with neoliberal approaches to health promotion and development; emphasizing risk management and individual responsibility, while glossing over the broader social and political factors influencing HIV transmission.

Restricted access

Michael A. Hemphill and Tom Martinek

Many kinesiology departments engage in partnerships that aim to promote positive youth development through physical activity. These partnerships are often enhanced by mutually beneficial goals and shared decision making between university and community partners. This paper describes how sport has been at the center of two university-community partnerships that have helped to teach life skills to youth. We draw upon our experience working with community partners to illuminate challenges and opportunities for youth-focused partnerships. The programs include an emphasis on sustainability. As kinesiology programs continue to enhance their efforts to partner and support youth development, case studies such as this may help inform our efforts.

Restricted access

Laura J. Burton, Heidi Grappendorf and Angela Henderson

Based on the tenets of role congruity theory, the current study examined the unequal representation of men and women in athletic administration positions. A total of 158 female and 118 male (n = 276) athletic administrators evaluated a male or female candidate for an athletic director, compliance director, or life skills director position within athletics. Participants indicated no significant differences in masculine ratings of male or female candidates and significant differences in feminine ratings for female candidates in the life skills position. Male and female candidates were perceived as similar in potential and likely success in all positions. Finally, the female candidate was evaluated as significantly less likely to be offered the athletic director position when compared with the male candidate.

Restricted access

Sarah I. Leberman and Nicole M. LaVoi

Despite the ubiquitous presence of mothers in sport contexts, mothers’ voices are often absent in the sport literature, particularly at the youth sport level. A phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of working mother volunteer youth sport coaches. A role-triad model based on the work-family enrichment and role enhancement literature provided the theoretical framework. The purpose was to understand how and why working mother-coaches mange this role triad and to identify mother-worker skills which may transfer to youth coaching and vice versa. Semistructured interviews were conducted with eight working mother-coaches and analyzed for themes. Findings suggest that notions of being a good mother and reasons for coaching are very similar, including spending time together, developing life skills and role modeling. Participants negotiated multiple roles using cognitive tools, such as reframing and separation of roles. The reciprocal benefits of motherhood, working and coaching for themselves and others were highlighted.

Restricted access

Sara K. Marshall and Paul Barry

Development practitioners and agencies consider sport to play a valuable role in social development; however, the emerging evidence does not yet adequately describe sport’s contribution to social development. Lyras (2009, 2012a) proposed a sport for development theory (SFDT) as a specific model to increase understanding of the processes and conditions involved in sport for development (SFD) programs. In our study, SFD practitioners of the Kicking AIDS Out Network were interviewed to identify project elements perceived as significant for achieving development objectives, and their perceptions were examined in relation to SFDT to test its applicability to their particular development context. The findings suggest SFDT offers an appropriate framework to enhance project design and delivery that integrates the features of sport, education, life skills development, use of leaders as change agents, and participation that are key to Kicking AIDS Out programs and other community sport programs promoting behavior and social change.

Restricted access

Michael Dao

yourself, or look after one another? An analysis of life skills in sport for development and peace HIV prevention curriculum . Sociology of Sport Journal, 31 ( 1 ), 287 – 303 . doi:10.1123/ssj.2013-0103 10.1123/ssj.2013-0103 Hasselgard , A. ( 2015 ). Norwegian sports aid: Exploring the Norwegian