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Laura J. Burton, Heidi Grappendorf and Angela Henderson

Based on the tenets of role congruity theory, the current study examined the unequal representation of men and women in athletic administration positions. A total of 158 female and 118 male (n = 276) athletic administrators evaluated a male or female candidate for an athletic director, compliance director, or life skills director position within athletics. Participants indicated no significant differences in masculine ratings of male or female candidates and significant differences in feminine ratings for female candidates in the life skills position. Male and female candidates were perceived as similar in potential and likely success in all positions. Finally, the female candidate was evaluated as significantly less likely to be offered the athletic director position when compared with the male candidate.

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Daniel Wigfield, Ryan Snelgrove, Luke R. Potwarka, Katie Misener and Laura Wood

of commitment, teamwork ability, and a heightened sense of enthusiasm for life on and off the court. PGC Basketball is the leader in basketball and life skills education compared to the other organizations classified as companies dedicated to providing comprehensive basketball development for

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Leeann M. Lower-Hoppe, Liz A. Wanless, Sarah M. Aldridge and Daniel W. Jones

, captions available upon request, alternative exercises, and instructions for how to obtain technical support. In one vein, transferring ownership of the learning process to students through the integration of blended learning can develop valuable life skills that prepare students for successful entry into

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Yannick Kluch and Amy S. Wilson

participated in 2019’s #NCAAInclusion social media campaign and joined Pitt Life Skills’ diversity and inclusion committee alongside other Pitt student-athletes. “We all bring our own perspective to the table and talk about making Pitt a welcoming place for all identities and all genders,” Coe beamed

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Meg G. Hancock, Lindsey Darvin and Nefertiti A. Walker

representation in compliance and academic services. Additional research also suggests that women are often funneled into the “soft areas” of intercollegiate athletics, including compliance, academic services, life skills, and sports information ( Grappendorf, Pent, Buton, & Henderson, 2008 ). Lumpkin et

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Sara K. Marshall and Paul Barry

Development practitioners and agencies consider sport to play a valuable role in social development; however, the emerging evidence does not yet adequately describe sport’s contribution to social development. Lyras (2009, 2012a) proposed a sport for development theory (SFDT) as a specific model to increase understanding of the processes and conditions involved in sport for development (SFD) programs. In our study, SFD practitioners of the Kicking AIDS Out Network were interviewed to identify project elements perceived as significant for achieving development objectives, and their perceptions were examined in relation to SFDT to test its applicability to their particular development context. The findings suggest SFDT offers an appropriate framework to enhance project design and delivery that integrates the features of sport, education, life skills development, use of leaders as change agents, and participation that are key to Kicking AIDS Out programs and other community sport programs promoting behavior and social change.

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Sarah I. Leberman and Nicole M. LaVoi

Despite the ubiquitous presence of mothers in sport contexts, mothers’ voices are often absent in the sport literature, particularly at the youth sport level. A phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of working mother volunteer youth sport coaches. A role-triad model based on the work-family enrichment and role enhancement literature provided the theoretical framework. The purpose was to understand how and why working mother-coaches mange this role triad and to identify mother-worker skills which may transfer to youth coaching and vice versa. Semistructured interviews were conducted with eight working mother-coaches and analyzed for themes. Findings suggest that notions of being a good mother and reasons for coaching are very similar, including spending time together, developing life skills and role modeling. Participants negotiated multiple roles using cognitive tools, such as reframing and separation of roles. The reciprocal benefits of motherhood, working and coaching for themselves and others were highlighted.

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Shaun M. Anderson and Matthew M. Martin

In 1989, former Major League Baseball (MLB) player John Young created the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program as a way to increase the number of African Americans becoming involved with the game of baseball. Along with this program, MLB created the Urban Youth Academy (UYA) in 2006 as a way to not only teach the game but also provide life skills to youth and adults. However, MLB continues to struggle in developing relationships and increasing involvement of African Americans. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand why African Americans are not interested or involved in MLB. Corporate social responsibility and relationship management theory were used as the frameworks for this study. Eleven RBI and UYA program managers were interviewed to determine the challenges they face in getting African Americans involved in the game. Results from this study indicated four themes regarding MLB program managers’ challenges: inconsistency in measuring success, lack of parental involvement, and lack of trust. A discussion, implications, and future directions are addressed.

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Megan B. Shreffler

former student-athlete to provide practical context of the success wheel being utilized. Secret 4 challenges student-athletes to acquire the life skills needed to succeed. Within this chapter, the authors have former athletes and current sport executives identify what they consider to be the best life

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Jens De Rycke, Veerle De Bosscher, Hiroaki Funahashi and Popi Sotiriadou

. social equality and inclusion, 2. collective identity and pride, 3. ethics and fair play, 4. feel good and passion, 5. fans and (media) attraction, 6. international prestige and image, 7. athletes’ ability and quality of life, 8. sport participation and life skills, 9. sponsors and commercial activity