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Bridget Ellen Philippa Bourke, Dane Francis Baker, and Andrea Jane Braakhuis

Social media such as blogs, social network sites, and media sharing sites are rapidly becoming a quick and easy avenue for consumers to access well-presented nutrition information. Not only can registered practitioners “post,” “tweet,” or “blog” nutrition information, so can any other user

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Celina H. Shirazipour, Madelaine Meehan, and Amy E. Latimer-Cheung

The Invictus Games are a parasport competition for service members and veterans with illnesses and injuries. The 2014 Games were aired by the BBC, for a total of 12 hr of coverage. This study aimed to investigate what messages were conveyed regarding parasport for veterans during the BBC’s Invictus Games broadcast. A content analysis was conducted. Five qualitative themes were identified: sport as rehabilitation, the promotion of ability over disability, the social environment, key outcomes of participation, and the importance of competition. Quantitative results indicated that 2 segment types accounted for the majority of the broadcast: sport coverage (50.57%) and athlete experiences (12.56%). Around half of the coverage focused on participants with a physical disability (51.62%). The findings demonstrate key similarities to and differences from previous explorations of parasport media coverage, with the needs of the event and athlete population potentially influencing the broadcast.

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Kate Ferrara, Jan Burns, and Hayley Mills

Despite some changes to the way that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are viewed in society, negative attitudes prevail. One of the aspirations of the 2012 Paralympic games was to influence the public’s attitudes toward people with disabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimuli depicting people with ID performing at Paralympic level of competition change attitudes toward ID. A mixed randomized comparison design was employed comparing 2 groups: those who viewed Paralympic-level ID sport footage and information and those who viewed Olympic footage and information. One hundred fourteen students, mean age 25 yr, were administered measures of implicit (subconscious) attitudes toward disability and explicit (belief-based) attitudes toward ID. Implicit attitudes significantly changed in a positive direction for both groups. The findings provide evidence that both Paralympic (ID) and Olympic media coverage may have at least a short-term effect on attitudes toward people with disabilities.

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Stephen Harvey and Jeffrey P. Carpenter

; Trust, Krutka, & Carpenter, 2016 ). Educators’ own priorities can influence what they consider powerful professional development and learning (PDL; Noonan, 2019 ). Research supports the notion that various social media sites (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Voxer, Pinterest, Instagram, etc.) have become

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Jeffrey P. Carpenter and Stephen Harvey

Over the past 15 years, various social media platforms have emerged as popular sites of self-directed professional development and learning (PDL) for educators. Such professional activities on social media are often voluntary in nature and therefore, logically, must offer some kind of benefit to

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Stephen Harvey, Jeffrey P. Carpenter, and Brendon P. Hyndman

Social media sites (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Voxer, Pinterest, Instagram, etc.) have irrevocably changed the modern world. The ways in which people communicate, shop, entertain themselves, construct their identities, find information, and build relationships and community are all being influenced

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Collin C. Brooks and Jaimie M. McMullen

Teacher specialists, including physical education teachers, often work in isolation, and their schedules frequently vary from other teachers within the school building ( Battersby & Verdi, 2015 ). There is some evidence that social media platforms, such as Twitter, can help educators and physical

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Jeffrey P. Carpenter and Stephen Harvey

This closing chapter examines what has been learned from the studies collected in this monograph and how this relates to the extant literature. The implications of this work for educator practice and future research on social media use for professional development and learning (PDL) are also

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Brent Hardin and Marie Hardin

This study explores the media-related attitudes and values of 10 male wheelchair athletes by soliciting their opinions and suggestions concerning disability sport print media. Using the “auto drive” technique for qualitative data collection, the analysis reveals four themes: (a) athletes are avid consumers of mainstream sport media; b) they use both mainstream and niche publications; (c) they do not want “courtesy coverage,” but instead, coverage focusing on elite elements of their sports; (d) they are unsure of media obligation in the coverage of sports involving athletes with disabilities. While the scope of this investigation is limited to male wheelchair athletes, the themes can provide a basis for further analysis and study in the emerging area of sport media research as it relates to disability.

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Pete Lindsay and Owen Thomas

The mass media focus on sporting events (Kristiansen, Hanstad, & Roberts, 2011), coupled with the interest in reporting the psychological aspects of sporting performance (Jones, 2005) can place practitioners in stressful situations (Fletcher, Rumbold, Tester, & Coombes, 2011). Concerns over “misrepresentation,” “misquotation,” “misinterpretation,” and being “incorrectly reported or understood” by the media can be at odds with a practitioner’s honest desire to disseminate findings and provide informed commentaries related to the discipline. This article aims to highlight the ethical, professional and personal challenges faced by Pete Lindsay while working as the resident sport psychologist for an international television broadcaster during a World championship sporting event. The autoethnographic account provides a series of reflective fragments that were abstracted from professional development documentation, supervisory meeting records of the time, and the authors recalled reflections of when Pete undertook the role. Practical implications for the training and certification of practitioners in relation to working within the media are considered.