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Emma Renehan, Claudia Meyer, Rohan A. Elliott, Frances Batchelor, Catherine Said, Terry Haines and Dianne Goeman

( Gillespie et al., 2012 ; Sherrington, Tiedemann, Fairhall, Close, & Lord, 2011 ). The Australian best practice guidelines recommend medication review and modification of medication regime as part of multifactorial approaches to falls prevention, particularly related to withdrawal of falls risk

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Ítalo R. Lemes, Rômulo A. Fernandes, Bruna C. Turi-Lynch, Jamile S. Codogno, Luana C. de Morais, Kelly A.K. Koyama and Henrique L. Monteiro

of its components individually. 13 – 15 In the United States, the presence of hypertension added US$68.4 billion to annual all-cause medication costs in 2007. 13 In addition, the estimated expenditure related to diabetes in 2012 was US$245 billion, 41% higher than the 2007 estimate. 14 Regarding

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Alex S. Ribeiro, Luiz C. Pereira, Danilo R.P. Silva, Leandro dos Santos, Brad J. Schoenfeld, Denilson C. Teixeira, Edilson S. Cyrino and Dartagnan P. Guedes

). However, given the burden of multimorbidity on disabilities and on costs with chronic diseases medications ( Picco et al., 2016 ), further empirical information of the specific association between sedentary behavior, as well as physical activity with multimorbidity and medication intake from low- and

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Hongjun Yu and Andiara Schwingel

, medication, and formal caregiving). Third, research, to date, has focused primarily on Western populations. China is home to the largest older adult population in the world, and to our knowledge, only one study ( Zhang & Chaaban, 2013 ) has investigated the impact of physical inactivity on public health care

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Margaret C. Morrissey, Michael R. Szymanski, Andrew J. Grundstein and Douglas J. Casa

-to-rest ratios based on the environmental conditions, using body-cooling strategies, enhancing education, using prudence when dispensing supplements and medications that may contain substances that enhance metabolic rate or compromise thermoregulation, and modifying time or location of physical activity, among a

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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Allison B. Smith, Natalie M. Welch and Robin Hardin

are begging for tenure.’” During her time at her first institution, Maggie suffered from anxiety and took medication for depression, but she feared this department head could ruin her reputation that she worked so hard to create. Maggie discussed how she knew this department head was treating other

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Kelli F. Koltyn

Chronic pain is a significant problem for many older adults. Strategies for pain management appear to be limited, with the prescription of analgesic medication used most often to treat pain. Older adults, however, are often sensitive to adverse side effects from analgesic medications, so nonpharmacological strategies for treating pain are receiving increased attention. This review article summarizes results from studies that have examined whether improvements in pain occur after an exercise intervention. Limited research has been conducted, and it can be characterized as both experimental and quasi-experimental. In addition, pain has usually been a secondary variable assessed in conjunction with a number of other variables. Results from most studies indicate that improvement in pain can occur after exercise training, but several investigators did not find changes in pain after an exercise-training program. Even less research has been conducted with older adults residing in assisted-care facilities, and this research is limited by small sample sizes.

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Barry Braun

The concept that participation in exercise/physical activity reduces the risk for a host of chronic diseases is undisputed. Along with adaptations to habitual activity, each bout of exercise induces beneficial changes that last for a finite period of time, requiring subsequent exercise bouts to sustain the benefits. In this respect, exercise/physical activity is similar to other “medications” and the idea of “Exercise as Medicine” is becoming embedded in the popular lexicon. Like other medications, exercise has an optimal dose and frequency of application specific to each health outcome, as well as interactions with food and other medications. Using the prevention of type-2 diabetes as an exemplar, the application of exercise/physical activity as a medication for metabolic “rehabilitation” is considered in these terms. Some recommendations that are specific to diabetes prevention emerge, showing the process by which exercise can be prescribed to achieve health goals tailored to individual disease prevention outcomes.

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Edward M. Phillips, Jeffrey Katula, Michael E. Miller, Michael P. Walkup, Jennifer S. Brach, Abby C. King, W. Jack Rejeski, Tim Church and Roger A. Fielding

Objectives:

To examine baseline characteristics and change in gait speed and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) scores in participants medically suspended (MS) from a physical activity intervention (PA).

Design:

Randomized controlled trial.

Setting:

University and community centers.

Participants:

Sedentary older adults (N = 213) randomized to PA in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P).

Measurements:

MS was defined as missing 3 consecutive PA sessions in adoption and transition phases or 2 wk in maintenance phase because of a health event.

Results:

In all, 122 participants completed PA without MS (NMS subgroup), 48 participants underwent MS and resumed PA (SR subgroup), and 43 participants underwent MS and did not complete PA (SNR subgroup). At baseline, SNR walked slower (p = .03), took more prescribed medications (p = .02), and had lower SPPB scores than NMS and SR (p = .02). Changes from baseline to Month 12 SPPB scores were affected by suspension status, adjusted mean (SE) SPPB change: SNR 0.0957 (0.3184), SR 0.9413 (0.3063), NMS 1.0720 (0.1871); p = .03.

Conclusions:

MS participants unable to return to complete the PA in a trial of mobility-limited sedentary older adults had slower walking speeds, lower SPPB scores, and a higher number of prescribed medications at baseline. Change in SPPB scores at 12 months was related to suspension status.

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Katja Borodulin, Anja Kärki, Tiina Laatikainen, Markku Peltonen and Riitta Luoto

Background:

Daily sitting time may be a risk factor for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, this has not yet been extensively studied. Our aim was to study the association of total sitting time with the risk of CVD.

Methods:

Participants (n = 4516, free of CVD at baseline) from the National FINRISK 2002 Study were followed for fatal and nonfatal CVD using national registers. Participants underwent a health examination and completed questionnaires, including total daily sitting time.

Results:

During a mean follow-up of 8.6 years, 183 incident CVD cases occurred. Sitting on a typical weekday, at baseline, was statistically significantly associated with fatal and nonfatal incident CVD. The hazard ratios (with 95% confidence intervals, CI) for the total amount of sitting were 1.05 (95% CI, 1.00–1.10) in the age and gender adjusted model and 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01–1.11) in the fully adjusted model, including age, gender, employment status, education, BMI, smoking status, leisure time physical activity, use of vegetables and fruit, alcohol use, blood pressure or its medication, and cholesterol or its medication.

Conclusions:

Our findings suggest that total amount of daily sitting is a risk factor for incident CVD. More research is needed to understand the etiology of sedentary behavior and CVD.