Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
Clear All
Restricted access

Marja Kokkonen

, Schipper van Veldhofen, Hartill, & Van Den Eede, 2015 ). In addition to gender, individuals belonging to gender and sexual minorities (GSMs) are at increased risk for sexual harassment in general. GSM refers to a population of people whose gender identity (i.e., felt, inherent sense of gender) or gender

Restricted access

Alexander Brian Yu, Thomas Nguyen and Trent Petrie

As racially diverse, early-career sport psychology consultants (SPCs), we reflect on our experiences working with collegiate athletes and coaches whose racial/ethnic status were different from our own. Our reflections cover (a) the external effects of stereotypes, presence (and pernicious effects) of microaggressions, and strategies for effectively coping with such transgressions; (b) stereotype threat and how Jeremy Lin’s entry into the NBA affected our self-perceptions; and (c) a call to action to further promote a multicultural approach to sport psychology training, research, and practice. In sharing these thoughts, we hope to promote further dialogue in the emerging field of cultural sport psychology.

Restricted access

Christina Yannetsos, Mario C. Pacheco and Danny G. Thomas

Concussions among athletes in contact sports are a prevalent health concern in the United States. There are few studies that have assessed concussion from the perspective of judo coaches. This is a descriptive study of a survey sent to 1,056 United States judo coaches assessing their attitudes, knowledge, and practices toward concussion. The survey had a response rate of 21%, with 215 total responses. Though most coaches could accurately identify common symptoms of concussion from a case presentation, many also misidentified nonconcussion and red flags (e.g., facial droop) as symptoms of concussion. A minority of coaches reported any formal training in concussion management. USA Judo coaches are receptive to and would benefit from a sport-specific standardized concussion training program.

Restricted access

Saunders N. Whittlesey, Richard E.A. van Emmerik and Joseph Hamill

Many studies have assumed that the swing phase of human walking at preferred velocity is largely passive and thus highly analogous to the swing of an unforced pendulum. In other words, while swing-phase joint moments are generally nonzero during swing, it was assumed that they were either zero or at least negligibly small compared to gravity. While neglect of joint moments does not invalidate a study by default, it remains that the limitations of such an assumption have not been explored thoroughly. This paper makes five arguments that the swing phase cannot be passive, using both original data and the literature: (1) Computer simulations of the swing phase require muscular control to be accurate. (2) Swing-phase joint moments, while smaller than those during stance, are still greater than those due to gravity. (3) Gravity accounts for a minority of the total kinetics of a swing phase. (4) The kinetics due to gravity do not have the pattern needed to develop a normal swing phase. (5) There is no correlation between pendular swing times and human walking periods in overground walking. The conclusion of this paper is that the swing phase must be an actively controlled process, and should be assumed to be passive only when a study does not require a quantitative result. This conclusion has significant implications for many areas of gait research, including clinical study, control theory, and mechanical modeling.

Restricted access

Megan N. Sears, Dani M. Moffit and Rebecca M. Lopez

patients is crucial in decreasing health disparities and improving communication between patient and practitioner. 4 , 5 , 7 Studies 7 – 11 have found that minority patients report greater satisfaction when receiving healthcare from a provider that they perceive to be more culturally competent and with

Restricted access

Elizabeth F. Teel, Stephen W. Marshall, L. Gregory Appelbaum, Claudio L. Battaglini, Kevin A. Carneiro, Kevin M. Guskiewicz, Johna K. Register-Mihalik and Jason P. Mihalik

concussion within 2 weeks, 3 yet up to 500,000 people annually report persistent dysfunction for months to years postinjury. 4 This significant minority is forcing researchers and clinicians to reconsider passive treatment strategies and progress toward active rehabilitation paradigms capable of mitigating

Open access

Erik A. Wikstrom, Cole Mueller and Mary Spencer Cain

, 29 – 31 , 33 , 37 also be assessed to determine RTS. However, there was no consistency among the recommended tests or among the included thresholds. A minority of papers recommended dynamic balance (n = 5, 45.5%) 29 , 30 , 32 , 35 , 37 and running (n = 4, 36.4%) 27 , 28 , 33 , 37 as domains that

Restricted access

John M. Dunn

An historical view of the life and contributions of Hollis Francis Fait to the field of special physical education is presented in this article. Dr. Fait’s childhood, education, and early career are explored as well as his success in developing at the University of Connecticut one of the first graduate programs to train physical educators to work with the handicapped. Dr. Fait’s perspectives on athletics, administration, minorities, and scholarship are described. His belief in the need for concise language and clarity of thought demonstrated in his own scholarship is discussed.

Restricted access

Peter J. Ellery and Michael J. Stewart

A survey of the 13 master’s level and five doctoral level adapted physical education programs that received federal funding in the United States in 1998 was conducted to develop a profile describing their attributes. The response rate was 100% (N = 18). Results indicated that these programs, in general, had received funding for more than 15 years, offered coursework from an average of three different academic disciplines, had a high graduate employment rate within 12 months of graduation, and had about one third of the graduates representing a recognized minority group. Master’s level teacher preparation programs were concentrated in the eastern region of the U.S., had graduates with predominantly in-state home addresses, and had graduated predominantly females. Doctoral level leadership programs were geographically distributed across the U.S., had graduates with predominantly out-of-state home addresses, and had equal graduate representation from both genders.

Restricted access

Viola C. Altmann, Jacques Van Limbeek, Anne L. Hart and Yves C. Vanlandewijck

A representative sample (N = 302) of the wheelchair rugby population responded to a survey about the classification system based on prioritized items by International Wheelchair Rugby Federation members. Respondents stated, "The classification system is accurate but needs adjustments" (56%), "Any athlete with tetraequivalent impairment should be allowed to compete" (72%), "Athletes with cerebral palsy and other coordination impairments should be classified with a system different than the current one" (75%), and "The maximal value for trunk should be increased from 1.0 to 1.5" (67%). A minority stated, "Wheelchair rugby should only be open to spinal cord injury and other neurological conditions" (36%) and "There should be a 4.0 class" (33%). Results strongly indicated that athletes and stakeholders want adjustments to the classification system in two areas: a focus on evaluation of athletes with impairments other than loss of muscle power caused by spinal cord injury and changes in classification of trunk impairment.