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Jay L. Alberts and Susan M. Linder

The acute and long-term effects of concussive and subconcussive head impacts on brain health have gained tremendous attention over the past five years. The treatment and management of concussion involves multiple providers from multiple disciplines and backgrounds. Varied backgrounds and approaches to assessing cognitive and motor function before and post-concussion are limiting factors in the efficient and effective management of concussion as discipline-specific rating scales and assessments serve as a barrier to effective patient hand-offs between providers. Combining principles of motor behavior with biomechanical approaches to data analysis has the potential to improve the continuity of care across the multiple providers managing athletes with concussion. Biomechanical measures have been developed and validated using mobile devices to provide objective and quantitative assessments of information processing, working memory, set switching, and postural stability. These biomechanical outcomes are integral to a clinical management algorithm, the Concussion Care Path, currently used across the Cleveland Clinic Health System. The objective outcomes provide a common data set that all providers in the spectrum of care can access which facilitates communication and the practice of medicine and in understanding the acute and long-term effects of concussion and subconcussive exposure on neurological function.

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Scott W.T. McNamara, Matthew Shaw, Kylie Wilson and Angela Cox

that received a podcast and a mobile device intervention. Both of these podcasts were developed using the SCT. There was no significant difference in weight loss. The two more recent studies have incorporated the podcasts as a supplementary or supporting component of the intervention ( Hales et

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Chad M. Killian and Amelia Mays Woods

stay up to date with course content in the event of absences ( McLaughlin et al., 2013 ; Schultz et al., 2014 ). Rivera ( 2015 ) observed students accessing and reviewing the online instruction on their mobile devices during in-class activities. Students in that study, who spoke English as a second