Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 78 items for :

  • "performance testing" x
  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
Clear All
Restricted access

Brittany Mann, Allison H. Gruber, Shane P. Murphy and Carrie L. Docherty

determine if ankle joint angles in the primary plane of motion differ between the braced and no-braced conditions at certain points in the functional performance tests. Methods Participants Twenty participants (11 females and 9 males; 20.6 [1.62] y, 1.77 [0.09] m, 74.75 [14.44] kg) who were involved in at

Restricted access

Jason Brumitt, Alma Mattocks, Jeremy Loew and Phil Lentz

an individualized injury prevention training program. A recent trend in sport science research is to prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of functional performance tests (FPTs) to discriminate injury risk in a population of athletes. 9 – 13 The aforementioned prospective cohort studies have

Restricted access

Jeffrey B. Taylor, Alexis A. Wright, James M. Smoliga, J. Tyler DePew and Eric J. Hegedus

Context:

Physical-performance tests (PPTs) are commonly used in rehabilitation and injury-prevention settings, yet normative values of upper-extremity PPTs have not been established in high-level athletes.

Objective:

To establish normative data values for the Closed Kinetic Chain Upper-Extremity Stability Test (CKCUEST) and Upper-Quarter Y-Balance Test (UQYBT) in college athletes and compare results between sports and to analyze the relationship between the 2 tests.

Design:

Observational.

Setting:

Laboratory/athletic facility.

Participants:

257 (118 male, 139 female) Division I athletes participating in basketball, soccer, baseball, lacrosse, volleyball, track and field, and cross-country.

Intervention:

CKCUEST and UQYBT scores were recorded as part of a comprehensive injury-risk screening battery.

Main Outcome Measure:

Pearson correlations assessed the relationship between all measures of the CKCUEST and UQYBT. A factorial ANOVA and a repeated-measures ANOVA (arm dominance) were used to assess interactions between sex, year in school, and sport for CKCUEST and UQYBT scores.

Results:

Normative values for the CKCUEST and UQYBT were established for 9 men’s and women’s college sports. No significant relationships were found between PPT scores. Men scored significantly higher than women for the CKCUEST (P = .002) and UQYBT (P = .010). Baseball players scored significantly higher than athletes from all other sports for the UQYBT (P < .001) but showed nonsignificant trends of lower scores for the CKCUEST than lower-extremity-dominant athletes such as runners (P = .063) and lacrosse players (P = .058).

Conclusions:

Results suggest that average CKCUEST and UQYBT scores in Division I athletes are distinct from those previously reported in recreationally active populations and that performance differences exist between sexes and sports. In addition, the CKCUEST and UQYBT appear to measure different constructs of performance and may complement each other as part of a screening battery.

Restricted access

Joshua M. Drouin and Bryan L. Riemann

Column-editor : Carl G. Mattacola

Restricted access

Joshua M. Drouin and Brian L. Riemann

Column-editor : Carl G. Mattacola

Restricted access

Joshua M. Drouin and Brian L. Riemann

Column-editor : Carl G. Mattacola

Restricted access

Joanne Munn, David J. Beard, Kathryn M. Refshauge and Raymond W.Y. Lee

Objective:

To determine whether the triple-crossover hop and timed shuttle run are able to discriminate between injured and uninjured limbs in subjects with functional ankle instability.

Design and Setting:

A comparative study involving the assessment of functional performance, conducted in a university gymnasium.

Participants:

A volunteer sample of 16 university-age subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability.

Outcome Measures:

The triple-crossover hop for distance and timed shuttle run measured functional performance, with the uninjured limb acting as a control. Subjects also rated their ankle symptoms using a self-report questionnaire.

Results:

The triple-crossover hop and shuttle run did not detect functional deficit despite subjects’ self-report scores indicating functional impairment.

Conclusions:

Results of the triple-crossover hop and shuttle run used in the clinic should be interpreted with caution, because they will not necessarily identify functional impairment.

Restricted access

Marjan Someeh, Ali Asghar Norasteh, Hassan Daneshmandi and Abbas Asadi

Context:

Ankle sprains or chronic ankle instability (CAI) is common in athletes and a common method for decreasing the effects of ankle instable is using tape.

Objective:

To determine whether Mulligan ankle taping (MAT) influenced the functional performance (FP) tests in athletes with and without CAI.

Design:

A cross-sectional study using a within-subject experimental design between four ankle conditions (taped and untaped, athletes with and without CAI).

Setting:

Research laboratory.

Participants:

Sixteen professional athletes with unilateral CAI (10 men and 6 women; age 23.2 ± 3 years, height 175.4 ± 10.3 cm, weight 73 ± 14.5 kg, and body mass index 23.8 ± 3.6%) and 16 uninjured professional athletes (10 men and 6 women; age 22.8 ± 1.7 years, height 173.6 ± 12.2 cm, weight 66.4 ± 11.4 kg, and body mass index 22.2 ± 3.3%) volunteered to participant in this study.

Intervention:

Mulligan ankle taping.

Main Outcome Measures:

FP tests including single leg hopping course, Figure-of-8 hop and side hop were measured for both the groups in two conditions: taped and untaped.

Results:

There were significant differences between injured and uninjured athletes in all FP tests (P < .05). MAT significantly improved FP tests in both groups (P < .05).

Conclusion:

We found that MAT can improve FP tests in athletes with CAI and uninjured athletes. Therefore, it seems that MAT can be an effective method for enhancing athletes’ performance in sports that require lateral movements.

Restricted access

Jeffrey R. Doeringer, Megan Colas, Corey Peacock and Dustin R. Gatens

-round training schedule), the sample size was based on availability. Instrumentation Not many instruments were used for this study. The Likert scale of muscle soreness were measured prior to muscle performance tests, 24 hr after the intervention, and 48 hr after intervention. The Likert scale for perceived pain

Restricted access

Revay O. Corbett, Tyler R. Keith and Jay Hertel

tests. The CAI group reported more perceived instability in their involved limb during 4 of the 5 functional performance tests, although it did not affect their performance. 12 Although FAI is a term used to categorize some with a history of ankle sprain, it is the presence of self-reported perceived