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Katelyn Barnes, Lauren Ball and Ben Desbrow

Personal trainers are well placed to provide nutrition care in line with their recommended scope of practice. However, providing nutrition care beyond their recommended scope of practice has been identified as an industry risk. The International Confederation of Registers for Exercise Professionals (ICREPs) have international standards for nutrition knowledge and skills that are recommended for all fitness professionals, including personal trainers. This study investigates whether the ICREPs standards align with i) national nutrition education standards and ii) national nutrition occupational standards and scopes of practice for personal trainers within ICREPs affiliated countries. Content analysis of each standard and/or scope of practice was undertaken to extract nutrition statements. Extracted statements were matched with nutrition components of the ICREPs standards to result in a score based on the number of aligned ICREPs knowledge and skills criteria. Ten countries, with 16 organizations, were identified as being involved in the development of national education standards, occupational standards, or scopes of practice for personal trainers. The educational and occupational standards varied widely among countries and had minimal alignment with the ICREPs standards. As such, the expected role of personal trainers in providing nutrition care appeared to differ between countries. Further work is required to support personal trainers to develop a level of knowledge and skills that enables the provision of safe, consistent, and effective nutrition care.

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Katelyn Barnes, Lauren Ball and Ben Desbrow

Personal trainers are well placed to provide basic nutrition care in line with national dietary guidelines. However, many personal trainers provide nutrition care beyond their scope of practice and this has been identified as a major industry risk due to a perceived lack of competence in nutrition. This paper explores the context in which personal trainers provide nutrition care, by understanding personal trainers’ perceptions of nutrition care in relation to their role and scope of practice. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 15 personal trainers working within Australia. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes. All personal trainers reported to provide nutrition care and reported that nutrition care was an important component of their role. Despite this, many were unaware or uncertain of the scope of practice for personal trainers. Some personal trainers reported a gap between the nutrition knowledge they received in their formal education, and the knowledge they needed to optimally support their clients to adopt healthy dietary behaviors. Overall, the personal training context is likely to be conducive to providing nutrition care. Despite concerns about competence personal trainers have not modified their nutrition care practices. To ensure personal trainers provide nutrition care in a safe and effective manner, greater enforcement of the scope of practice is required as well as clear nutrition competencies or standards to be developed during training.

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Mark R. McKean, Gary Slater, Florin Oprescu and Brendan J. Burkett

Australia has approximately 26,000 registered exercise professionals (REP), in comparison with 3,379 accredited practicing dietitians (APD). The REP workforce has the potential to reach more than 10% of the Australian population but there is limited data on their educational background and professional behaviors with regards to nutritional counseling of clients. The purpose of this research was to determine if REPs are working within their scope of practice and if their qualifications align with their practice, specifically as it relates to nutrition advice. Using a cross sectional descriptive study design, a self-administered online survey of REPs was conducted over 5 months. REPs were recruited through electronic and social media using a snowballing technique. The study focused on education, nutrition advice, and sources of information. A total of 286 respondents completed the survey, including 13 with tertiary dietetic qualifications i.e., APDs. The nationally recognized industry Certificate III/IV in Fitness was the most common qualification. The majority of REPs responding (88%) were working outside of their professional scope of practice, offering individual nutrition advice to clients across fitness and medical issues. This was despite 40% of REPs undertaking no further training in nutrition since graduating, and primarily basing advice on use of readily accessible sources of nutrition information. It is recommended the nutrition advice provided to REPs during training be limited to general nonmedical nutrition information in accordance with nationally endorsed evidence based guidelines and that issues pertaining to scope of practice be addressed with onward referral to other health professionals be advocated.

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Woubeshet Ayenew, Emily C. Gathright, Ellen M. Coffey, Amber Courtney, Jodi Rogness and Andrew M. Busch

trainer has been cited as a solution to overcoming anxiety and lack of motivation in people with SMI. 15 In our study, no personal trainers were utilized. However, the program was highly embraced by the psychiatric rehabilitation staff and Nice Ride volunteers offered regular midday group rides during

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Rebecca Reynolds, Santhya and David Menzies

federal governments, collaborations with other organizations, interventions targeting specific groups of people (eg, chronic disease specific), and the provision of training courses and guidelines for health professionals (eg, personal trainers, doctors, and nurses). Member goals relating to physical

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Stephen M. Glass, Alessandro Napoli, Elizabeth D. Thompson, Iyad Obeid and Carole A. Tucker

by each of 3 human raters who were experienced with BESS test administration: 2 physical therapists (each with >10 y of experience, including BESS experience deriving from research, instruction, and musculoskeletal screening) and 1 personal trainer (>10 y of experience, with >5 y of experience

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Jordan Deneau, Sean Horton and Paula M. van Wyk

’s college Teacher Married Scott 80 Master’s degree Principal Married Brendan 80 Teacher’s college Teacher Widower Barry 78 One year of university Personal trainer b Married Inactive ( n  = 6) Gordon 85 Grade 11 Photo editor Widower Ty 78 Trade school Mechanic Married Ted 79 Grade 11 Business owner Married

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Dimitrios Challoumas and Andreas Artemiou

optimization programs. Acknowledgments We would like to thank the personal trainer Maria Aristeidou for her invaluable assistance in data collection and the coaches and players of the teams Nea Salamina and AE Karava for their participation. The results of this study do not constitute endorsement of the

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Todd Miller, Stephanie Mull, Alan Albert Aragon, James Krieger and Brad Jon Schoenfeld

. All training sessions were performed under the individual supervision of a certified personal trainer from Power Train. Training sessions continued at a rate of two to three per week (depending on training phase) for 16 weeks. The RT intervention consisted of two separate workout complexes that were

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Morgan Potter, John C. Spence, Normand Boulé, Jodie A. Stearns and Valerie Carson

used to assess physical fitness at follow-up ( 5 ). At least one research assistant facilitating data collection was certified as a personal trainer through the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. The battery of fitness tests measured anthropometry (waist circumference), cardiovascular fitness