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Richard Shusterman

Somaesthetics is an interdisciplinary research program that originated in pragmatist philosophy at the very end of the twentieth century and that has developed into an active academic field with its own journal ( The Journal of Somaesthetics ) and book series (Studies in Somaesthetics) and a

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Douglas Booth

By Grant Farred. Temple University Press , 2018, Philadelphia (224 pp., $99.50 , hardback; $34.95 , paperback). In The Burden of Over-representation , Grant Farred illustrates the power of continental philosophy to illuminate the intersection of race, politics and sport which he captures in an

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Samuel M. Clevenger

Philosophy of Sport and Physical Activity is a laudable achievement. The book elucidates and synthesizes a myriad of historical eras within the global history of sport and physical culture, employing a “cross-disciplinary” (p. vii) framework that effectively relates kinesiological scientific questions

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John Gleaves

Human performance enhancement is one of kinesiology’s many vibrant topics for inquiry. Though philosophers in kinesiology departments have offered some contribution to this topic, this paper argues that philosophers could improve their relevance by better engaging the existing scientific research. Rather than simply defending their place at the table, this paper proposes that philosophers build upon existing contributions to the ethics of human enhancement by increasing their scientific literacy. At the same time, this paper argues that certain patterns in philosophical discussions of human enhancement do not connect with scientific researchers. The paper concludes that ultimately philosophers must become more conversant with the language of science if they are going to continue contributing to central questions within the field of kinesiology.

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Bradley J. Cardinal, Minsoo Kang, James L. Farnsworth II, and Gregory J. Welk

Kinesiology leaders were surveyed regarding their views of the (re)emergence of physical activity and public health. Their views were captured via a 25-item, online survey conducted in 2014. The survey focused on four areas: (a) types of affiliation with public health; (b) program options and course coverage; (c) outreach programming; and (d) perspectives on integration. Member and nonmember institutions of the American Kinesiology Association received the survey. Responses were received from 139 institutional leaders, resulting in an overall response rate of 21.4%. Key findings included that the combination of physical activity and public health was seen as both a stand-alone subdisciplinary area within kinesiology and also an area that has a great deal of potential for collaboration, the acquisition of external funding, and further strengthening of community outreach and engagement. The survey results are placed in historical context and interpreted with various caveats and limitations in mind.

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John Corlett

Although today some athletic events are organized by those without any administrative qualifications, much of modern sport management reflects the technocratic global culture from which it springs: formalized, institutionalized, and professionalized. Some recent critical assessments of our dominant philosophical influences have been extremely unkind to the administrative practices that they have spawned. Among the charges leveled is that management, in general, lacks a moral and epistemological base and is self-serving and antidemocratic. Much of this criticism is relevant to the management of modern sport. This paper presents an overview of the positions of philosophers Alasdair Maclntyre, John Ralston Saul, and Charles Taylor and examines management's relationship to sport in light of their critiques. A general philosophical framework is constructed upon which specific questions about specific activities of sport management can be asked and possibly answered. The results have implications for the education and work of sport managers.

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Jeffrey D. James

observation, focus groups, and interviews. What was missing from the program of study was course work through which students were challenged to understand inquiry not only from a philosophy of science perspective, but also from the philosophy of inquiry. In other words, to challenge individuals to understand