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Catrine Tudor-Locke and Elroy J. Aguiar

coordinated effort from the U.S. government ( Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2018 ; Pate et al., 1995 ; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008 ), as well as several leading professional organizations ( American Heart Association, 1992 ; Colberg et al., 2016 ; Garber et

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Katrina L. Piercy, Frances Bevington, Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Sandra Williams Hilfiker, Sean Arayasirikul and Elizabeth Y. Barnett

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (the guidelines) outlines recommendations for the amount and types of physical activity necessary for good health based on the current scientific evidence. It includes specific physical activity dosages for youth and adults and additional

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

Services convened the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee (PAGAC) to review and summarize the current scientific evidence regarding the relationship between physical activity and health. The committee’s report serves as the basis for the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans , 2nd

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Andrea Torres, Bethany Tennant, Isabela Ribeiro-Lucas, Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Katrina Piercy and Bonny Bloodgood

Physical activity is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic diseases 1 , 2 that are major drivers of morbidity, disability, and health care costs in the United States. 2 The US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (guidelines

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Eric T. Hyde, John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Janet E. Fulton and Susan A. Carlson

Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things people of all ages can do to improve their health. 1 , 2 In 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines) , which contain separate physical

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James F. Sallis and Kevin Patrick

The International Consensus Conference on Physical Activity Guidelines for Adolescents convened to review the effects of physical activity on the health of adolescents, to establish age-appropriate physical activity guidelines, and to consider how these guidelines might be implemented in primary health care settings. Thirty-four invited experts and representatives of scientific, medical, and governmental organizations established two main guidelines. First, all adolescents should be physically active daily or nearly every day as part of their lifestyles. Second, adolescents should engage in three or more sessions per week of activities that last 20 min or more and that require moderate to vigorous levels of exertion. Available data suggest that the vast majority of U.S. adolescents meet the first guideline, but only about two thirds of boys and one half of girls meet the second guideline. Physical activity has important effects on the health of adolescents, and the promotion of regular physical activity should be a priority for physicians and other health professionals.

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Frances Bevington, Katrina L. Piercy, Kate Olscamp, Sandra W. Hilfiker, Dena G. Fisher and Elizabeth Y. Barnett

change. 3 , 4 Further, as the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee concluded in its Scientific Report, “Strong evidence shows that behavior change theories and techniques are effective for increasing physical activity levels.” 3 In an effort to increase the number of Americans working

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Ross E. Andersen and John M. Jakicic

The aim of this review is to provide a scientific update on the current guidelines for both health and weight management. There has been confusion among health professionals as to which physical activity guidelines should be used to help various specific populations adopt more active lifestyles. We first review the history of the physical activity guidelines. Using the physical activity guidelines in clinical practice is also explored. We also describe common barriers to physical that overweight individuals report and we discuss when it is appropriate for a health care professional to seek a referral from an exercise scientist to help sedentary adults increase their levels of activity. It is important for individuals who care for overweight patients and sedentary adults to understand the current physical guidelines and how these guidelines can be worked into clinical practice.

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John J. Reilly, Adrienne R. Hughes, Xanne Janssen, Kathryn R. Hesketh, Sonia Livingstone, Catherine Hill, Ruth Kipping, Catherine E. Draper, Anthony D. Okely and Anne Martin

normally have brief wakings during the night but learn to settle themselves back to sleep within a few minutes. Table 6 The UK 2019 Physical Activity Guidelines for the Under 5s Infants. Being physically active several times in a variety of ways, including interactive floor-based activity e

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Ashley Walker, Jody Langdon and Krystina Johnson

Background:

Young adults have the highest participation in physical activity but also have the highest incidence rates of binge drinking, cigarette smoking, and smokeless tobacco use. We examined these factors to determine whether there are relationships among physical activity and health risk behaviors.

Methods:

We conducted correlation and χ2 analyses using the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment fall 2009 data set (N = 34,208) to examine the relationship among meeting physical-activity guidelines, binge drinking, and tobacco use among survey participants.

Results:

The data suggest a positive relationship between meeting physical-activity guidelines and binge drinking, with the strongest relationship between those reporting binge drinking 4 times in a 2-week period. Meeting physical-activity guidelines was negatively associated with cigarette use but positively associated with all other types of tobacco use.

Conclusion:

Associations between physical activity and binge-drinking episodes indicate a need to address the relationship between heavy drinking and alcohol dependence and physical-activity behavior patterns. Further studies should examine relationships between physical activity and binge drinking in other age groups. Results also suggest the need to examine differing associations between physical activity and types of tobacco use.