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Bruno Manfredini Baroni, Jeam Marcel Geremia, Rodrigo Rodrigues, Marcelo Krás Borges, Azim Jinha, Walter Herzog and Marco Aurélio Vaz

It is not known if a physically active lifestyle, without systematic training, is sufficient to combat age-related muscle and strength loss. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate if the maintenance of a physically active lifestyle prevents muscle impairments due to aging. To address this issue, we evaluated 33 healthy men with similar physical activity levels (IPAQ = 2) across a large range of ages. Functional (torque-angle and torque-velocity relations) and morphological (vastus lateralis muscle architecture) properties of the knee extensor muscles were assessed and compared between three age groups: young adults (30 ± 6 y), middle-aged subjects (50 ± 7 y) and elderly subjects (69 ± 5 y). Isometric peak torques were significantly lower (30% to 36%) in elderly group subjects compared with the young adults. Concentric peak torques were significantly lower in the middle aged (18% to 32%) and elderly group (40% to 53%) compared with the young adults. Vastus lateralis thickness and fascicles lengths were significantly smaller in the elderly group subjects (15.8 ± 3.9 mm; 99.1 ± 25.8 mm) compared with the young adults (19.8 ± 3.6 mm; 152.1 ± 42.0 mm). These findings suggest that a physically active lifestyle, without systematic training, is not sufficient to avoid loss of strength and muscle mass with aging.

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Amy R. Barchek, Shelby E. Baez, Matthew C. Hoch and Johanna M. Hoch

inactivity. However, patients may not be aware of the risks associated with an inactive lifestyle. Therefore, it is important that clinicians educate their patients on the benefits of a physically active lifestyle, with the impetus to either improve their patient’s participation in physical activity or

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ZáNean McClain, Daniel W. Tindall and E. Andrew Pitchford

. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51 (3), 553–570. Physical Education Transition Planning Experiences Among Deafblind Adults Regardless of ability or disability, the benefits of a physically active lifestyle are well documented. Unfortunately, individuals who are deafblind tend not to participate in

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ZáNean McClain, Jill Pawlowski and Daniel W. Tindall

, while attempting to manage potential obstacles that would discourage a physically active lifestyle. Haegele, J.A., Hodge, S.R., Gutierres Filho, P., Ribeiro, N., & Martınez-Rivera, C. (2018). A phenomenological inquiry into the meaning ascribed to physical activity by Brazilian men with visual

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. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51 (3), 553–570. doi: 10.1002/jaba.474 Physical Education Transition-Planning Experiences Among Deaf–Blind Adults Regardless of ability or disability, the benefits of a physically active lifestyle are well documented. Unfortunately, individuals who are deaf–blind tend

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Tina Smith, Sue Reeves, Lewis G. Halsey, Jörg Huber and Jin Luo

dynamic loads through physical activity 17 rather than static loads due to excess adiposity alone, indicating there is no mechanical advantage to the bone as a result of obesity unless accompanied by a greater lean mass and a physically active lifestyle. 9 It is therefore important that the contribution

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Stamatis Agiovlasitis, Joonkoo Yun, Jooyeon Jin, Jeffrey A. McCubbin and Robert W. Motl

empowering the person and by creating disability-friendly environments ( Rimmer & Rowland, 2008 ). Empowering individuals experiencing disability to make the decision to adopt a physically active lifestyle can be facilitated by providing knowledge and skills related to PA and behavior change and recognizing

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Luis Columna, Denzil A. Streete, Samuel R. Hodge, Suzanna Rocco Dillon, Beth Myers, Michael L. Norris, Tiago V. Barreira and Kevin S. Heffernan

, & Hand, 2006 ). In order for parents of children with VI to maximize PA opportunities for their children, they need to have the intent (desire and will); support; and skills needed to promote, encourage, and teach physically active lifestyles to their children ( Columna et al., 2017 ; Lepore, Columna