Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 918 items for :

  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ronnie Lidor, Gershon Tenenbaum, Gal Ziv and Vladimir Issurin

Deliberate practice (DP), an activity aimed at enhancing an individual’s performance, has been reported to be crucial for achieving a state of expertise in various domains, such as education, music, and sport. In this article, the relationships between DP and the process of athletic performance adaptation are explored by elaborating on the main principle of the theory of training—periodization. We argue that periodization should be considered as a mechanism for ensuring DP, and that the implementation of periodization principles (cycles and phases) in DP activities can facilitate adaptation processes leading to expert performance. We describe the characteristics and features of DP, review a series of studies on DP and athletic performance (N = 21), discuss the importance of periodization in sport training, and outline a number of benefits of periodization. A model that emphasizes the link between periodization and DP activities in each phase of sport development is proposed, and a number of research approaches to address periodization are discussed.

Restricted access

Mark Urtel, Sara F. Michaliszyn and Craig Stiemsma

Internships in higher education are not a new practice. In fact, it is generally noted that the first formal internship program occurred in 1889 at Johns Hopkins Medical School ( Wentz & Ford, 1984 ). Prior to this, medical school faculty were developing ways for medical “apprentices” to acquire

Open access

Hebe Schaillée, Ramón Spaaij, Ruth Jeanes and Marc Theeboom

Knowledge translation has emerged as an important area of research activity to enhance the fit between research-based knowledge and its application in policy and practice ( Greenhalgh & Wieringa, 2011 ). National competitive research funding schemes increasingly demand that applicants demonstrate

Restricted access

David R. Bassett, Patty S. Freedson and Dinesh John

, less than perfect measure that is highly related to health. Today, BMI has been universally accepted and is widely used in clinical practice and public health surveillance. Similar to BMI, steps per day is easy to comprehend and has the potential to provide a simple, standardized metric with tremendous

Restricted access

Clayton R. Kuklick and Brian T. Gearity

, these practices flourished alongside the logic and growth of capitalism and modernism ( Markula & Pringle, 2006 ). As the need for obedient, responsible, and productive workers grew, and modernism and its (post)positivist science (e.g., anatomy, biomechanics, physiology, statistics) flourished

Restricted access

Laurel Richardson

New writing practices in qualitative research include evocative writing—a research practice through which we can investigate how we construct the world, ourselves, and others, and how standard objectifying practices of social science unnecessarily limit us and social science. Evocative representations do not take writing for granted but offer multiple ways of thinking about a topic, reaching diverse audiences, and nurturing the writer. They also offer an opportunity for rethinking criteria used to judge research and reconsidering institutional practices and their effects on community. Language is a constitutive force, creating a particular view of reality and the Self. No textual staging is ever innocent (including this one). Styles of writing are neither fixed nor neutral but reflect the historically shifting domination of particular schools or paradigms. Social scientific writing, like all other forms of writing, is a sociohistorical construction, and, therefore, mutable.

Restricted access

Melissa Pangelinan, Marc Norcross, Megan MacDonald, Mary Rudisill, Danielle Wadsworth and James McDonald

successful program implementation. To address these potential limitations and develop meaningful experiential-learning opportunities, best practices have been identified by the National Society for Experiential Education ( NSEE, 1998 ; http://www.nsee.org/8-principles ). These eight principles are useful in

Full access

Sarah Zipp, Tavis Smith and Simon Darnell

brought menstruation to the forefront of gender in international development research and practice ( Bobel, 2018 ). We expand on this example later in this article, along with other examples of how adaptive preferences help illustrate often overlooked aspects of gendered socialization into sport. We

Open access

Jeremy Hapeta, Rochelle Stewart-Withers and Farah Palmer

This article seeks to make higher level contributions to the nexus between theory and practice within sport for social change by shining light on Indigenous theory and practice in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). First, we acknowledge the forward and timely thinking of this special issue for providing

Restricted access

P. David Howe and Carwyn Jones

In recent years the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), the institution responsible for the administration, organization, and management of the Paralympic Games, has reshaped the landscape of sport for the disabled. This article argues that the IPC has marginalized the practice community, notably the International Organizations of Sport for the Disabled. By wrestling away control of the classification systems developed by these organizations, the IPC has transformed them to such an extent that they fail to provide opportunities for equitable sporting practice and the result has been a threat to the ideology of Paralympism. We illustrate this by examining two classification systems that are currently used within Paralympic Sport: the integrated functional system employed in the sport of swimming and the disability-specific system used within athletics.