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Hebe Schaillée, Ramón Spaaij, Ruth Jeanes and Marc Theeboom

Knowledge translation has emerged as an important area of research activity to enhance the fit between research-based knowledge and its application in policy and practice ( Greenhalgh & Wieringa, 2011 ). National competitive research funding schemes increasingly demand that applicants demonstrate

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Sarah Zipp, Tavis Smith and Simon Darnell

brought menstruation to the forefront of gender in international development research and practice ( Bobel, 2018 ). We expand on this example later in this article, along with other examples of how adaptive preferences help illustrate often overlooked aspects of gendered socialization into sport. We

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Jeremy Hapeta, Rochelle Stewart-Withers and Farah Palmer

This article seeks to make higher level contributions to the nexus between theory and practice within sport for social change by shining light on Indigenous theory and practice in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). First, we acknowledge the forward and timely thinking of this special issue for providing

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Inge Claringbould and Annelies Knoppers

The gender ratio of those in positions of leadership continues to be skewed toward a male majority. The purpose of this study is to explore how practices of gender may contribute to the lack of significant change in this skewed ratio in (sport) organizations. We situate our study within Martin’s (2003, 2006) notion of practices of gender. We conducted interviews with 15 sport journalists and 32 members of boards of governance of sport organizations to investigate how the skewed gender ratio was maintained and challenged by paradoxical practices of gender. The results show that practices of gender neutrality, normalcy and passivity strengthened and maintained the current gender skewness. We also give examples of disruptive practices that contributed to the undoing of gender in these organizations.

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Jon Welty Peachey, Nico Schulenkorf and Ramon Spaaij

Practice cannot be blind to theory, and theory cannot be blind to practice. This is simple to say yet immensely difficult to do. ( Morrison & van der Werf, 2012 , p. 400) Theory development around sport for social change agendas has received greater attention from scholars over the past 10 years

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Tim Wilson

By Eric C. Schwarz and Jason D. Hunter. Published 2018 by Routledge , New York, NY. $52.95 . 354 pp. ISBN: 978-1-138-06158-3 The third edition of Advanced Theory and Practice in Sport Marketing is an excellent resource for both sport management faculty and students. Eric C. Schwarz and Jason D

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Melanie Sartore-Baldwin and Catherine Quatman-Yates

The purpose of this study was to introduce ethnographic research to students in two graduate-level sport management courses, assess the extent to which the students benefited throughout the duration of the project, and anticipate future benefits as a result of the project. In response to previous calls for a more thorough integration of theory, research, and practice within sport management curricula, a plan to integrate ethnography projects into a sport management human resource management course and a contemporary issues course was developed and implemented. The strengths and weaknesses of the project are discussed relative to student feedback received through journal excerpts and interviews from the students and instructor fieldnotes. Suggestions and guidelines for future uses of ethnography as a teaching tool are offered.

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Veera Ehrlén

This case study examines contemporary recreational sports practitioners’ communication practices and social tie formation from the perspective of two lifestyle sports disciplines: climbing and trail running. Online survey results from 301 climbers and trail runners from Finland indicate that computer-mediated communication (CMC) has established its place in recreational lifestyle sports cultures; however, it has not done it at the expense of face-to-face (FtF) communication. Online interaction produces weak social ties with instrumental and informative value, but physical location is essential in establishing ties with emotional and appraisal value. This paper argues that it is the sports subculture and individual practitioners’ needs that define how interaction is realized, and what importance different online and off-line communication practices have. Besides studying communication practices, this case study explores the social meanings practitioners attribute to their social contacts.

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Jonathan Casper, Michael Pfahl and Mark McSherry

The relationship of sport to sustainability management is relatively unknown. Despite the increasing recognition of the growing role of athletics in regard to environmental sustainability, it remains unclear what role athletics departments have with regard to environmental action and what is currently being done now. The purpose of this study is to examine American intercollegiate athletics department personnel in relation to their organization’s sustainability practices, organizational strategies, and personal perspectives at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) universities. Athletics department members (N = 97) who were most responsible for sustainability initiatives responded to a survey designed to assess awareness levels and concern for environmental issues and the strategies and practices at work in their respective athletics departments. Findings based on prioritization, planning, decision-making, and use of initiatives using frequencies and means are reported. Differences, using t tests were also compared based on BCS or non-BCS standing. Results show that although environmental concern is high, there is disconnect between concern and action perhaps due to a lack of communication between the athletics department and the general university, cost concerns, and a lack of knowledge about sustainability initiatives. Implications related to the need for better communication between the athletics department/university and improved planning and prioritization is discussed.

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Douglas M. Carroll

The emergence of single-sport cable channels represents a refinement of the allsports cable-channel concept and a new trend in the televised-sport marketplace. This study analyzed the contents of 24 continuous hours of programming on Golf Channel and tabulated the number and types of advertisements to better understand commercial programming strategies and practices. Commercial programming elements such as spot commercials, spot promotions, sponsored graphics, pop-up promotions, mentions, infomercials, and public service announcements were identified. In addition, commercial programming during live tournament coverage was compared with golf telecasts at 2 broadcast networks and an all-sports cable channel. The study measured 3 indicators of the amount of advertising presented in the telecasts: the number of commercial minutes per hour, the number of advertisements per hour, and the average duration of spot commercials. Results of the study were interpreted in terms of advertising clutter.