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Stephanie M. Mazerolle and Chantel Hunter

away from the job and relying on friends and family are essential to finding a balance in the professional sports setting. Finding a balanced lifestyle is often challenging for many athletic trainers working in the secondary school 1 and intercollegiate athletics settings. 2 Working within the sports

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Lidsy McLean

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Stephanie M. Mazerolle and Chantel Hunter

Professional commitment has been studied in multiple settings, yet little is known about the professional sport setting. A total of 27 male athletic trainers, employed full time in the professional sport setting, participated in this study. Our participants were 34 years old (range 30–58), with 21 ± 7 years of experience as a certified athletic trainer, and more than 17 ± 7 years of experience in the professional setting. We conducted online asynchronous interviews. All data were analyzed following an interpretative approach. Data saturation was met, and we used a peer review and researcher triangulation. Barriers to professional commitment included time away from family/home and negative work environment. The facilitators to professional commitment were competition, positive work environment, and off-season professional development. The professional sport setting is unique, much like the collegiate setting, and thus our findings highlight that time away and a negative workplace atmosphere can reduce an athletic trainer’s commitment. Commitment to the profession, however, is enhanced within this setting because of the chance to be around the high level of competition, as well as the chance to have time for professional development.

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Corey P. Ochs, Melissa C. Kay and Johna K. Register-Mihalik

exposures in football 1 to 1.55/1000 athlete exposures in ice hockey. 2 Professional sports leagues, such as the National Football League (NFL) and National Hockey League (NHL), have instituted policies to assess and manage concussions, including return to play; however, little is known about the

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apply in an athletic trainer’s specific clinical roles. They will also be able to examine how worker’s compensation and the professional sports league’s rules intersect with HIPAA. Registration is open now at www.nata.org/career-education/education/events/webinars . Honors & Awards Nominations Open

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Shaun C. Tyrance, Henry L. Harris and Phyllis Post

This study examined the relationship between athletic identity, race, gender, sport, and expectation to play professionally and career planning attitudes (career optimism, career adaptability, and career knowledge) among NCAA Division I college student-athletes. Participants of this study consisted of 538 Division I student-athletes from four Bowl Championship Series institutions. Results of this study found that Division I student-athletes with higher athletic identities had lower levels of career optimism; Division I student-athletes who participated in revenue-producing sports had lower levels of career optimism; and student-athletes with a higher expectation to play professional sports were more likely to be optimistic regarding their future career and displayed higher athletic identities. Statistically significant findings indicated the following gender differences: male Division I student-athletes believed they had a better understanding of the job market and employment trends; males had more career optimism; and females had higher levels of athletic identity than their male counterparts. Implications for counseling student-athletes are addressed.

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MUST TAKE THIS QUIZ ONLINE. 1. As noted by Mazerolle and Hunter, since 2007, about what percentage of NATA membership works in the professional sports setting? a. 1% b. 2.5% c. 4.5% d. 6% 2. In the same article, what was the average number of hours worked during the in-season? a. 55 b. 65 c. 75 d

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Jessica Barrett, Alicia Pike and Stephanie Mazerolle

stakeholders involved in hiring and working with female athletic trainers will illuminate the lived experiences of female athletic trainers working with male sports teams. Future research could focus on extending the sample population to include all college levels as well as professional sports. As discussed

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Corbin A. Hedt, S. Brett Holland, Bradley S. Lambert, Joshua D. Harris and Patrick C. McCulloch

of service  <1 12  1–5 49  6–15 28  >15 13 Setting of practice  Outpatient PT clinic designated as general rehabilitation 17  Outpatient PT clinic designated as sports medicine/orthopedics 77  Contract therapist with clinical and/or team affiliation 7  Full time with a professional sports

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Richard J. Boergers, Thomas G. Bowman, Nicole Sgherza, Marguerite Montjoy, Melanie Lu and Christopher W. O’Brien

representation of the respondents was High School (public, private, clinic outreach) = 61.52%, College (community college, NCAA Division I, II, III institutions) = 30.78%, Professional Sports = 3.5%, Other = 4.2% (Figure  2 ). Our sample appeared to be representative of the work settings reported by the