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Ellen J. Staurowsky and Jessica DiManno

As the American public is confronted with a more established female sport presence at all levels, the potential for girls to consider a career in sport media has expanded exponentially. Girls growing up in the age of ‘GRRL Power’ envision themselves as professional basketball players, world champion soccer stars, women who run like the wind, and as sports broadcasters. However, the dawn of a new age has also brought with it increasing complexity with regard to the issues aspiring young women seeking careers in sport media encounter. The overall purpose of this study was to extend the frame of our understanding about gender, sport, and the media by documenting the experiences, concerns, and attitudes of undergraduate females who hope to pursue careers as sports journalists, sports broadcasters, and sport media professionals. Based on interviews with ten undergraduate women, the next generation of women in sport media are more than prepared to take on with confidence, assertiveness, and a great deal of solid professional training the challenges that await them. However, even as undergraduates, these women have had to deal with, and make sense, of sexual objectification and sexism in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for how to support young women in their quest to pursue careers in sport media.

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Peter W. Grandjean, Burritt W. Hess, Nicholas Schwedock, Jackson O. Griggs and Paul M. Gordon

Kinesiology programs are well positioned to create and develop partnerships within the university, with local health care providers, and with the community to integrate and enhance the activities of professional training, community service, public health outreach, and collaborative research. Partnerships with medical and health care organizations may be structured to fulfill accreditation standards and the objectives of the “Exercise is Medicine®” initiative to improve public health through primary prevention. Barriers of scale, location, time, human resources, and funding can be overcome so all stakeholder benefits are much greater than the costs.

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Sarah J. Hatteberg

advanced professional training. Many 4-year universities exhibit the all-encompassing nature of total institutions because students sleep, work, and play in the same location (campus) among their peers, and follow university schedules ( Fitz Gibbon, Canterbury, & Litten, 1999 ). Research suggests

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John D. Fair

had professional training and experience. While the film attempted to exemplify the Greek maxim of a sound mind in a sound body, two of them represented Roman goddesses. Grandpa Ulysses Mulvain’s name is not just Greek but Homeric, but Grandma (Evelyn Varden) Mulvain is clearly out of synch. Laden

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Patricia Vertinsky

, 2002 ). 26 By dancing in high schools and colleges, he believed, they had exposed boys and young men to masculine dance as an art form for the first time in America. In a statement to the press, Shawn claimed that the young men of his group, like graduate college students finishing their professional

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Meg G. Hancock, Alicia Cintron and Lindsey Darvin

). Shadowing, internships, professional training opportunities, and volunteer experiences have been shown to positively influence career interests, expectations, and goals ( Chinomona & Surujlal, 2012 ; Cunningham et al., 2005 ). Gomez-Mejia ( 1983 ) found that such “on-the-job experience” might also reduce

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David Ekholm

coaches who have practiced sport continuously in life but lack professional training in education or social work. The coaches, predominantly men aged between twenty and thirty, have experience of growing up in socio-economically distressed, so-called areas of exclusion—something that is stressed in the

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Patricia Vertinsky

In this paper I view the history of kinesiology in America through the lens of a shifting academic landscape where physical culture and building acted upon each other to reflect emergent views concerning the nature of training in physical education and scientific developments around human movement. It is also an organizational history that has been largely lived in the gymnasium and the laboratory from its inception in the late nineteenth century to its current arrangements in the academy. Historians have referred to this in appropriately embodied terms as the head and the heart of physical education, and of course the impact of gender, class, and race was ever present. I conclude that the profession/discipline conundrum in kinesiology that has ebbed and flowed in the shifting spaces and carefully organized places of the academy has not gone away in the twenty-first century and that the complexities of today’s training require more fertile and flexible collaborative approaches in research, teaching, and professional training.

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Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo and Damon P.S. Andrew

sequential experiential mentoring: Apprenticeship concepts in the professional training and development of academics . Sport Management Education Journal, 8 ( 1 ), 71 – 74 . doi:10.1123/smej.2014-0019 10.1123/smej.2014-0019 Fiske , A.P. ( 1992 ). The four elementary forms of sociality: Framework for a

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Leah E. Robinson

) conduct interdisciplinary research on issues related to healthy aging; (b) provide professional training of students and health care practitioners working with older adults in a variety of settings; (c) offer a variety of health, psychological, and functional assessments; (d) conduct a range of community