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Elizabeth Campbell and Graham Jones

This paper considered (a) the psychological well-being of wheelchair sport participants and wheelchair sport nonparticipants, and (b) the influence of competitive level on the psychological well-being of wheelchair sport participants. Psychological well-being was evaluated by considering mood, trait anxiety, self-esteem, mastery, and individual self-perceptions of health and well-being. Wheelchair sport participants exhibited an iceberg profile of positive well-being with lower tension, depression, anger, and confusion and higher vigor than the sport nonparticipant group. The sport participant group also showed significantly greater levels of mastery and more positive perceptions of their health and well-being than the sport nonparticipant group. International athletes had (a) higher levels of vigor than the national and recreational groups; (b) lower levels of anxiety than the regional and recreational groups; (c) higher levels of self-esteem than the national, regional, and recreational groups; (d) higher levels of mastery than the regional and recreational groups; and (e) more positive perceptions of their well-being than the national, regional, and recreational groups.

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C. Michael Greenwood, David A. Dzewaltowski and Ron French

The importance of self-efficacy as a cognitive mediator of wheelchair mobile individuals’ psychological well-being was examined. Specifically assessed were competitive wheelchair tennis participants’ and wheelchair nontennis participants’ mood and self-efficacy toward performing tennis and general wheelchair mobility tasks. Wheelchair tennis participants exhibited an iceberg profile of positive well-being and were higher than the Profile of Mood States norm on vigor and lower than the norm on tension, anger, depression, fatigue, and confusion. Furthermore, wheelchair mobility self-efficacy significantly correlated with wheelchair tennis self-efficacy. More important, both self-efficacy measures correlated significantly with vigor for the wheelchair tennis participants and wheelchair mobility self-efficacy correlated significantly with each mood factor except depression for the wheelchair nontennis participants. It was concluded that wheelchair mobile individuals participating in tennis may be more confident about performing tennis skills and general wheelchair mobility tasks than are wheelchair mobile nonparticipants.

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Paul E. Yeatts, Ronald Davis, Jun Oh and Gwang-Yon Hwang

key component of sport competition, which has been used to promote the psychological well-being of injured military personnel. Dr. Guttmann ( 1976 ), a neurosurgeon, is credited as the first professional to utilize sport competition as part of the rehabilitative process to help injured British

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

Reid ( 2011 ) • Instructors should be attentive toward providing developmentally appropriate yet challenging activities to enhance participants’ mastery skills. Psychological well-being • Insufficient evidence   PA participation • Insufficient evidence   Note. Studies with ratings that were at least

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Celina Shirazipour and Krystn Orr

physical activity interventions (both lifestyle physical activity and exercise) for improving physical functioning, psychological well-being, and/or physical activity participation in persons with disabilities. One of the strengths highlighted in this line of research is its diverse use of intervention

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Shaunna M. Burke, Jennifer Brunet, Amanda Wurz, Christina Butler and Andrea Utley

-being as the attainment of happiness through the occurrence of positive affect, the absence of negative affect, and the experience of life satisfaction. The eudaimonic approach, underpinning psychological well-being ( Ryff, 1989 ), defines well-being through six aspects of human actualization: self

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Chunxiao Li, Ngai Kiu Wong, Raymond K.W. Sum and Chung Wah Yu

. doi:10.1177/135910457000100301 10.1177/135910457000100301 Brown , K.W. , & Ryan , R.M. ( 2003 ). The benefits of being present: Mindfulness and its role in psychological well-being . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84 , 822 – 848 . PubMed ID: 12703651 doi:10

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Eva A. Jaarsma, Damian Haslett and Brett Smith

injury: Effects on strength, arm ergometry performance and psychological well-being . Spinal Cord, 41 ( 1 ), 34 – 43 . PubMed ID: 12494319 doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3101389 10.1038/sj.sc.3101389 Holt , N.L. , Camiré , M. , Tamminen , K.A. , Pankow , K. , Pynn , S.R. , Strachan , L