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Paul S. Bradley and Jack D. Ade

interruptions rather than fatigue. 14 Therefore, this approach does not seem to be the solution as it provides negligible insight regarding physical efforts with a tactical purpose (eg, recovery running). The scarcity of research merging physical, technical, and tactical components is even more surprising when

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Judith H. Placek, Sarah A. Doolittle, Thomas A. Ratliffe, Patt Dodds, Penelope A. Portman and Kathy M. Pinkham

This study described 476 recruits’ physical education backgrounds and beliefs about the purposes for physical education. Beliefs about purposes are formed in part by physical education experiences and are important to examine because they are difficult to change and because they influence students’ receptivity to teacher education. Most recruits recalled programs that focused on traditional team sports, games, and fitness programs, with less emphasis on individual sports and expressive or noncompetitive activities. Few differences by sex, race, or socioeconomic status were found. Recruits’ reported purposes were coded into nine categories; the top purposes were learning skills, named specific activities, and fitness. The discussion focuses on the possibility of the existence of a de facto national curriculum and factors to consider if changes in physical education curriculum are desired.

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Mary D. Walling and Joan L. Duda

This study examined the relationship of students’ goal orientation to their beliefs about what leads to success in physical education and perceptions of the purposes of physical education. High school students (N = 144,78 females and 66 males) completed a modified version of the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire and measures of beliefs and perceived purposes specific to physical education class. Results indicated that students high in task orientation were significantly more likely to believe that success is achieved through intrinsic interest/effort/cooperation than were those low in task orientation. High ego-oriented students believed that success is achieved when students possess high ability more so than low ego-oriented students. The high task/low ego students were most likely to reject the notion that success in physical education occurs when students know how to use deceptive tactics and were less likely to perceive that an important function of physical education is to provide an easy class.

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Amy Meltzer Rady, Brenda Segall, Antoinette Tiburzi, Ann E. Jewett and L. Sue Jones

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Sarah M. Robinson

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Maureen A. Speakman-Yearta

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Marilyn J. LaPlante and Ann E. Jewett

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Linda M. Lander and Peggy A. Chapman