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Maureen M. Smith

Edited by David L. Andrews, Daniel S. Mason and Michael L. Silk

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Craig Hyatt

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Amy Whitehead, Kanayo Umeh, Barbara Walsh, Eleanor Whittaker and Colum Cronin

. ( 1992 ). Achievement goals and adaptive motivational patterns: The role of the environment . In G.C. Roberts (Ed.), Motivation in sport and exercise human kinetics (pp.  161 – 176 ). Champaign, IL : Human Kinetics . Andrews , D.L. , Mason , D.S. , & Silk , M.L. ( 2005 ). Qualitative

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Sue Colyer

This study of organizational culture in selected sport associations in Western Australia introduced a quantitative methodology to explore organizational culture to show its usefulness to complement the more qualitative methods traditionally applied to the study of organizational culture. The study used the competing values approach to develop cultural profiles for three sport organizations, which were compared with the sport association members' anecdotal, subjective views of their respective organizations. While the findings reveal evidence of the tensions between volunteers and employees that suggest the existence of subcultures, this study just touches the tip of the organizational culture “iceberg” in sport management. The conclusions indicate some benefits of using the competing values model in conjunction with more qualitative methods to probe sport organizational culture.

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Pirkko Markula and Lorraine A. Friend

There are many qualitative methods that, from different theoretical frameworks, can be used to map individuals’ everyday experiences in the sport industry. In this article we introduce one such method, memory-work, which involves participants writing specific texts about recalled experiences that are then analyzed in a collective research group. In order to discuss how sport management researchers can benefit from this methodology, this article explains the paradigmatic framework and the process of conducting memory-work. It concludes by assessing benefits of this interpretive methodology for sport management research.

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Pirkko Markula

materialists engage in conceptual readings (e.g.,  Coole & Frost, 2010 ), some discuss how qualitative methods can correspond with the theoretical advances to transcend the humanist ways of gathering research data. For example, Fox and Alldred ( 2017 ) suggested “re-engineering” methodology for the purposes of

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Gretchen Kerr, Erin Willson and Ashley Stirling

. Child Abuse Review, 13 ( 3 ), 215 – 223 . doi:10.1002/car.843 10.1002/car.843 Green , J. , & Thorogood , N. ( 2009 ). Qualitative methods for health research . In J. Green & N. Thorogood (Eds.), Qualitative methods for health research (pp.  3 – 34 ). London, UK : Sage . Hobson , W

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Kathy Babiak

Interorganizational relationships have become increasingly important for sport organizations. The purpose of this study was to explore the determinants and conditions of partnership formation in a group of collaborating nonprofit, public, and private organizations. A conceptual framework that includes the determinants of legitimacy, stability, necessity, asymmetry, reciprocity, and efficiency were used. Conditions including interdependence and presence of an interpersonal network were also explored. This research employed qualitative methods to examine partners’ reasons for developing interorganizational relationships in a sport context. For the collaborating organizations, the determinants of legitimacy, stability, reciprocity, and efficiency prevailed as important motives for relationship formation. These findings help to refine and apply contemporary theory to sport management and can be used to help manage interorganizational relationships.

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Lesley Ferkins and David Shilbury

To learn more about the governance of sport organizations, this study explored what meaning board members of national sport organizations (NSOs) attach to the concept of “strategic capability”. In so doing, the inquiry also identified factors considered to constrain or enable board strategic function. This paper draws on a body of knowledge developed over 38 years on board strategic function, primarily from the commercial setting but also from the emerging body of work in the nonprofit and sport governance setting. Located within the interpretive research paradigm this study engaged a range of different qualitative methods including cognitive mapping and visual imagery. Working across two NSOs in New Zealand, four elements were generated that served as reference points in mapping out the meaning of a strategically able board. These were categorized as the need to have capable people, a frame of reference, facilitative board processes, and facilitative regional relationships.

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John H. Kerr and Pippa Grange

This case study examined interpersonal communication in sport in the form of verbal aggression among elite athletes in the Australian Football League (AFL). It focused on the experience and motivation of athletes who use athlete-to-athlete verbal aggression and the responses of athletes who have been the targets of verbal aggression during games. In addition, the reasons athletes have for not engaging in verbal aggression were also examined. Purposive sampling procedures produced a select sample of elite male athletes known for their aggressive approach to playing Australian football. Qualitative methods and deductive analysis procedures, informed by J.H. Kerr’s categories of sport aggression, were used to interpret the interview data. Meaningful insights into verbal aggression in the AFL were obtained. Based on the underlying motivation, interview transcript descriptions of incidents were identified as examples of power, thrill, and anger verbal aggression.