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Kyle A. Rich and Audrey R. Giles

This article examines the piloting of a cultural safety training module in the Canadian Red Cross’s (CRC’s) Water Safety Instructor Development Program. Thematic analysis of interviews with program participants and facilitators revealed two main themes: Inclusion is important and valued by instructors, and accommodation for cultural and ethnic diversity is difficult to achieve in aquatics settings. Doherty and Chelladurai’s (1999) framework was used to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the pilot module. In conclusion, the authors propose that cultural safety training for the instructors alone will not lead to the provision of culturally safe sport; rather, there needs to be a change in the overall organizational culture in which the CRC’s programs are offered if they are to succeed. These findings make three contributions to the literature. First, the authors bridge the existing bodies of literature on critical Whiteness theory and sport management literature that addresses the management of diversity. Second, the authors explore the novel application of cultural safety training for instructors of a sport program. Finally, the authors offer recommendations to enable the development of an organizational culture that is facilitative and supportive with respect to inclusion (i.e., is welcoming) and accommodation (i.e., is flexible and adaptable) of cultural and ethnic diversity in aquatics programming.

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Lee Phillip McGinnis and James W. Gentry

The golf industry is currently undergoing a “churning effect” whereby players are leaving nearly as quickly as they enter; this effect is especially prevalent among women. We examine interviews from male and female golf professionals, as well as transcripts from interviews with female participants of various playing levels and experience, in order to determine the reasons women not only leave golf, but more importantly, why they stay. Our data indicate that once golfers have become hooked on the game, interpersonal and structural constraints have more influence on participation than intrapersonal constraints, whereas women new to golf face intrapersonal constraints (mainly related to ability) and structural constraints (but ones somewhat different from frequent participants). We suggest strategies that might reduce the intrapersonal (helping new players of both sexes achieve a minimal level of mastery), interpersonal (development of a more gender neutral environment to reduce the likelihood of “differentness” being noted), and structural (provision of child care facilities at the course, reducing the 18-hole mentality) constraints.

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Claire-Marie Roberts and Jacky Forsyth

, 2018 ; Keay, 2018 ), and that instances of heavy menstrual bleeding (resulting in iron deficiency) should not be overlooked ( Bruinvels, 2018 ). Yet, Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S), otherwise known as the Female Athlete Triad, can impair physiological function such as menstrual function

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the reproductive axis and bone, low energy availability is now recognized to cause other adverse health and performance effects according to the relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) model. Low energy availability can arise unintentionally, such as by an increased training load not matched by an

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Colin J. Lewis, Simon J. Roberts, Hazel Andrews and Rebecca Sawiuk

to develop into more destructive violence. To say a drinking culture existed on the course is somewhat of an understatement. After the first few days it was apparent who the drinkers were. The absence of certain individuals at breakfast was the first clue. The red eyes, croaky voices, vacating the

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Travis Anderson, Sandra J. Shultz, Nancy I. Williams, Ellen Casey, Zachary Kincaid, Jay L. Lieberman and Laurie Wideman

Set I. Red line represents the percentage of samples greater than limit of detection. Note: M1:M6 = Day 1 to 6 of menses; L1:L10 = Day 1 to 10 of luteal phase. The greatest proportion (100%) of detectable samples in DSII occurred at a similar time point to DSI (Sample #14), with the vast majority of

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Nicole Johnson, Katie Hanna, Julie Novak and Angelo P. Giardino

. The Center has developed additional online resources for parents and age-appropriate training for youth to engage and inform, in order to recognize and respond to any red flags of abuse. A free online parent course introduces the Center and provides an overview of understanding sexual misconduct and

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Diane M. Culver, Erin Kraft, Cari Din and Isabelle Cayer

engagement  • Third GENC meeting: Vancouver, BC February 2019  • Knowledge transfer opportunity at the Canada Games in Red Deer, Alberta April 2019  • Fourth GENC meeting and poster presentation CoP Webinar: Introduction to the program evaluation May 2018  • In person practical session on program evaluations

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Simon McEnnis

This article presents a study that examined what citizen journalism on Twitter has meant for the professional identity and working practices of British sport journalists, using data from a series of in-depth, semistructured interviews. Sport journalists recognized the need to strive for higher professional standards to ensure that their output is of greater cultural significance than that of citizen journalists. Trust—achieved through the ideologies of truth, reliability, and insight—was seen as essential to achieving this distinction. The democratization of breaking news has meant that red-top tabloid and 24-hr rolling news environments must reinvent themselves by making greater use of other journalistic practices including investigative reporting.

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Jimmy Sanderson

This research explored people’s expression of parasocial interaction (PSI) on Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling’s blog, 38pitches.com. A thematic analysis using grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) and constant comparative methodology of 1,337 postings on Schilling’s blog was conducted. Three parasocial aspects emerged from data analysis: identification, admonishment and advice giving, and criticism. The findings of the study provide support for previous research that suggests identification is a PSI component, and given the large presence of admonishment and criticism, the findings extend PSI theory by suggesting that PSI theory must account for and encompass negative relational behaviors. The results also indicate that people’s use of information and communication technologies is reconfiguring parasocial relationships as fans take an active role in soliciting and communicating with professional athletes, subsequently creating more opportunities for PSI to occur.