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Laura Desveaux, Roger Goldstein, Sunita Mathur and Dina Brooks

Nonadherence to exercise is a main cause of reduced function for older adults with chronic disease following completion of rehabilitation. This quantitative study used a questionnaire to evaluate the barriers and facilitators to community-based exercise following rehabilitation, from the perspectives of older adults with chronic diseases and their healthcare professionals (HCPs). Questionnaires were administered one-on-one to 83 older adults and 35 HCPs. Those with chronic disease perceived cost (43%), travel time (43%), and physical symptoms (39%) as primary barriers to program participation, with similar perceptions across all chronic conditions. Access to a case manager (82%), a supported transition following rehabilitation (78%), and a condition-specific program (78%) were the primary facilitators. Significant between group differences were found between HCPs and older adults with chronic disease across all barriers (p < .001), with a greater number of HCPs perceiving barriers to exercise participation. There were no between-group differences in the perception of factors that facilitate participation in exercise.

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Courtney W. Hess, Stacy L. Gnacinski and Barbara B. Meyer

, has prompted a growing demand for evidence (i.e., empirical research, professional practice knowledge) to inform practice in sport-injury rehabilitation. Despite consistent efforts toward improved evidence-based practice, sport-injury rehabilitation outcomes remain suboptimal at best. For example, in

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Kym Joanne Price, Brett Ashley Gordon, Kim Gray, Kerri Gergely, Stephen Richard Bird and Amanda Clare Benson

during recovery ( Ades et al., 2006 ; Oldridge & Stump, 2004 ). Therefore, patients entering cardiac rehabilitation have a considerably lower (by approximately 60% in males) exercise capacity than age-matched individuals free of coronary heart disease ( Ades et al., 2006 ). This concurs with self

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Carolee Winstein

trials include the Extremity Constraint Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) trial ( Wolf et al., 2006 ), the VA-Robot trial ( Lo et al., 2010 ), the Locomotor Experience applied Post Stroke (LEAPS) trial ( Duncan et al., 2011 ), the Epidural Electrical Stimulation for Stroke Rehabilitation (Everest

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Alis Bonsignore, David Field, Rebecca Speare, Lianne Dolan, Paul Oh and Daniel Santa Mina

of exercise in reducing treatment-related side effects and increasing the well-being of cancer survivors. 10 , 11 Major oncology and rehabilitation organizations have also identified the importance of incorporating exercise-based programs in comprehensive cancer care; however, access to these

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Lynne Evans and Lew Hardy

There is an increasing awareness within the sport-related literature of the importance of psychological factors in the rehabilitation of injured athletes. This awareness and subsequent investigations have led to the proposed application of grief response models to injury. However, to date limited attention has been paid to the clinical psychology literature on grief. The purpose of this paper is to redress this oversight by providing a review of the most relevant literature on the psychological responses of injured athletes in light of the philosophical and empirical research into loss and grief in the clinical literature. As a result of this review, a number of issues are raised for future research into grief models of injury.

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Woubeshet Ayenew, Emily C. Gathright, Ellen M. Coffey, Amber Courtney, Jodi Rogness and Andrew M. Busch

established psychiatric treatment settings may mitigate some of the access-related barriers to behavior change in SMI populations. Indeed, a behavioral intervention that connected to patients through outpatient psychiatric rehabilitation programs demonstrated promising effects on weight loss 9 and

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Lance B. Green

The purpose of this treatise is to provide an educational text that (a) cites existing literature supporting a mind-body paradigm for rehabilitation from psychophysiological and psychomotor perspectives, (b) demonstrates the application of imagery techniques within the chronology of an athletic injury, and (c) describes the performance-related criteria to which an athlete can compare his or her progress during rehabilitation. The chronology includes the period of time preceding the injury, the attention given to the athlete immediately following the injury, and the subsequent rehabilitation program leading to the athlete’s return to practice and competition. Examples of imagery experientials are used to illustrate its application throughout the chronology.

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Diane M. Wiese-Bjornstal, Kristin N. Wood, Andrew C. White, Amanda J. Wambach and Victor J. Rubio

response to the sport injury and rehabilitation process posits and research supports that sport injuries are stressful life events triggering the use of a wide variety of coping strategies, including R/S coping ( Wiese-Bjornstal et al., 1998 ). Within this model, personal factors such as religious

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Barry Braun

The concept that participation in exercise/physical activity reduces the risk for a host of chronic diseases is undisputed. Along with adaptations to habitual activity, each bout of exercise induces beneficial changes that last for a finite period of time, requiring subsequent exercise bouts to sustain the benefits. In this respect, exercise/physical activity is similar to other “medications” and the idea of “Exercise as Medicine” is becoming embedded in the popular lexicon. Like other medications, exercise has an optimal dose and frequency of application specific to each health outcome, as well as interactions with food and other medications. Using the prevention of type-2 diabetes as an exemplar, the application of exercise/physical activity as a medication for metabolic “rehabilitation” is considered in these terms. Some recommendations that are specific to diabetes prevention emerge, showing the process by which exercise can be prescribed to achieve health goals tailored to individual disease prevention outcomes.