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Walter Gantz, Lawrence A. Wenner, Christina Carrico and Matthew Knorr

This paper describes the role of televised sports in married life. It documents how adults integrate televised sports into their relationship with their spouse and evaluate its impact on that relationship. Telephone interviews were conducted with 399 married adults residing in San Francisco and Indianapolis. Respondents were asked about their own TV sports viewing behaviors as well as those of their spouse. Televised sports appears to play a generally positive albeit small role in marital life. TV sports viewing often is a shared activity and does not appear to trigger many scheduling or TV viewing conflicts. And, when such conflicts occur, they appear to be resolved amicably and easily. It may be that accommodations for differing interests in TV sports are resolved early in a marital relationship, along with other accommodations that marriage often dictates.

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Chris Knoester and Theo Randolph

, 2016 ). Yet, it is rare for sport studies research to focus on father-child interactions and their implications for health and father-child relationships ( Coakley, 2011 ; Kay, 2006 ; Messner & Musto, 2014 ). This is surprising, considering the unique and central role of sports interactions as part

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Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo and Damon P.S. Andrew

between students and teachers or professors ( Eliasson, Berggren, & Bondestam, 2000 ; Schrodt, Cawyer, & Sanders, 2003 ; van Eck Peluchette & Jeanquart, 2000 ). However, mentoring in an educational setting is not limited to these relationships. Just as in business, people in academic settings move up

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Kari Stefansen, Gerd Marie Solstad, Åse Strandbu and Maria Hansen

In this paper, we explore coach-athlete sexual relationships (CASRs) from the perspective of young athletes, with the aim of adding to the evolving research on CASRs as a contested social phenomenon. Our starting point is what we see as two conflicting images of such relationships in contemporary

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Gashaw Abeza, David Finch, Norm O’Reilly, Eric MacIntosh and John Nadeau

Emerging from its interdisciplinary roots into a distinct field in the early 1980s ( Berry, 1983 ), relationship marketing (RM) evolved as an important conceptual lens for both marketing scholars and practitioners ( Agariya & Singh, 2011 ). Since Berry’s ( 1983 ) first and formal description of the

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Christopher R. Hill, Deborah L. Feltz, Stephen Samendinger and Karin A. Pfeiffer

the literature have also highlighted the importance of varying types of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship to PA during both childhood and adolescence ( Van Der Horst, Paw, Twisk, & Van Mechelen, 2007 ; Voskuil & Robbins, 2015 ). However, the literature examining BSE beliefs in adolescents is

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Thilo Kunkel, Daniel C. Funk and Daniel Lock

associations linked to a brand ( Gladden & Funk, 2001 , 2002 ; Kunkel, Funk, et al., 2014 ). Although each set of brand associations is conceptually distinct, a formal relationship exists in which the league acts as a master brand and teams operate as a set of sub-brands ( Kunkel et al., 2013 ). The

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Thilo Kunkel, Rui Biscaia, Akiko Arai and Kwame Agyemang

-brand image ( Escalas & Bettman, 2003 ) and a strong SBC often leads consumers to develop and maintain a committed relationship with the brand ( Fournier, 1998 ). In a celebrity endorsement context, SBC has been suggested to partly mediate the relationship between the perceived credibility of an endorser and

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Jonathan A. Jensen and T. Bettina Cornwell

sponsored organizations, the dynamics of sponsor–property relationships have been afforded scant attention. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to better understand factors and conditions that may jeopardize what could be a long-term, multiyear relationship, in a dynamic, integrated model of

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Yu Kyoum Kim and Galen Trail

Sport consumers are increasingly discontented and disconnected with sport organizations and researchers have advocated a fundamental shift in sport marketing from a traditional exchange paradigm to a relationship paradigm. Relationship quality is critical to understanding sport consumer-organization relationships because it can: (a) render a platform to organize wide-ranging relational constructs; (b) provide insight into evaluating relationship-marketing effectiveness; and (c) diagnose and address problems in relationships. Therefore, we propose a conceptual framework of sport consumer-organization relationship quality that consists of three main components. First, we specify that relationship quality consists of five distinct but related relational constructs (trust, commitment, intimacy, self-connection, and reciprocity). Second, we suggest that relationship quality influences word of mouth, media consumption, licensed-product consumption, and attendance behaviors. Finally, we argue that psychographic factors such as relationship styles, relationship drive, and general interpersonal orientation are moderators, as well as demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, region, and income.