Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 437 items for :

  • "relationships" x
  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
  • Sport Business and Sport Management x
Clear All
Restricted access

Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo and Damon P.S. Andrew

between students and teachers or professors ( Eliasson, Berggren, & Bondestam, 2000 ; Schrodt, Cawyer, & Sanders, 2003 ; van Eck Peluchette & Jeanquart, 2000 ). However, mentoring in an educational setting is not limited to these relationships. Just as in business, people in academic settings move up

Restricted access

Gashaw Abeza, David Finch, Norm O’Reilly, Eric MacIntosh and John Nadeau

Emerging from its interdisciplinary roots into a distinct field in the early 1980s ( Berry, 1983 ), relationship marketing (RM) evolved as an important conceptual lens for both marketing scholars and practitioners ( Agariya & Singh, 2011 ). Since Berry’s ( 1983 ) first and formal description of the

Restricted access

Thilo Kunkel, Daniel C. Funk and Daniel Lock

associations linked to a brand ( Gladden & Funk, 2001 , 2002 ; Kunkel, Funk, et al., 2014 ). Although each set of brand associations is conceptually distinct, a formal relationship exists in which the league acts as a master brand and teams operate as a set of sub-brands ( Kunkel et al., 2013 ). The

Restricted access

Thilo Kunkel, Rui Biscaia, Akiko Arai and Kwame Agyemang

-brand image ( Escalas & Bettman, 2003 ) and a strong SBC often leads consumers to develop and maintain a committed relationship with the brand ( Fournier, 1998 ). In a celebrity endorsement context, SBC has been suggested to partly mediate the relationship between the perceived credibility of an endorser and

Restricted access

Jonathan A. Jensen and T. Bettina Cornwell

sponsored organizations, the dynamics of sponsor–property relationships have been afforded scant attention. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to better understand factors and conditions that may jeopardize what could be a long-term, multiyear relationship, in a dynamic, integrated model of

Restricted access

Emily Stadder and Michael L. Naraine

across various social media consisting of 18- to 25-year-old consumers, these platforms are ideal for companies trying to reach this target audience ( Spredfast, n.d. ). Social media allows companies to build relationships with their publics by being able to communicate and interact on these platforms

Restricted access

Yu Kyoum Kim and Galen Trail

Sport consumers are increasingly discontented and disconnected with sport organizations and researchers have advocated a fundamental shift in sport marketing from a traditional exchange paradigm to a relationship paradigm. Relationship quality is critical to understanding sport consumer-organization relationships because it can: (a) render a platform to organize wide-ranging relational constructs; (b) provide insight into evaluating relationship-marketing effectiveness; and (c) diagnose and address problems in relationships. Therefore, we propose a conceptual framework of sport consumer-organization relationship quality that consists of three main components. First, we specify that relationship quality consists of five distinct but related relational constructs (trust, commitment, intimacy, self-connection, and reciprocity). Second, we suggest that relationship quality influences word of mouth, media consumption, licensed-product consumption, and attendance behaviors. Finally, we argue that psychographic factors such as relationship styles, relationship drive, and general interpersonal orientation are moderators, as well as demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, region, and income.

Restricted access

Kathy Babiak, Lucie Thibault and Annick Willem

As the nature and scope of the sport industry have changed around the world, the role of interorganizational relationships (IORs) has become central to the operations of a variety of sport organizations (cf. Bingham & Walters, 2013 ; Franco & Pessoa, 2013 ; Grix & Phillpots, 2011

Restricted access

Chad Seifried, Brian Soebbing and Kwame J.A. Agyemang

interorganizational relationships (IR), which Babiak and Thibault ( 2008 ) defined as “voluntary, close, long-term, planned strategic action between two or more organizations with the objective of serving mutually beneficial purposes in a problem domain” (p. 282). The literature overall emphasizes IR as purposive

Restricted access

Fei Gao, Bob Heere, Samuel Y. Todd and Brian Mihalik

, the coordination and cooperation between stakeholders are of the utmost importance and that scholars should examine these temporary partnerships. Research on interorganizational relationships (IORs; Gray, 1985 ; Lee, 2001 ; Selsky & Parker, 2005 ) shows the complexity and challenges of setting up