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Raouf Hammami, Anis Chaouachi, Issam Makhlouf, Urs Granacher and David G. Behm

Balance, strength and power relationships may contain important information at various maturational stages to determine training priorities.

Purpose:

The objective was to examine maturity-specific relationships of static/dynamic balance with strength and power measures in young male athletes.

Methods:

Soccer players (N = 130) aged 10–16 were assessed with the Stork and Y balance (YBT) tests. Strength/power measures included back extensor muscle strength, standing long jump (SLJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 3-hop jump tests. Associations between balance with strength/power variables were calculated according to peak-height-velocity (PHV).

Results:

There were significant medium-large sized correlations between all balance measures with back extensor strength (r = .486–.791) and large associations with power (r = .511–.827). These correlation coefficients were significantly different between pre-PHV and circa PHV as well as pre-PHV and post-PHV with larger associations in the more mature groups. Irrespective of maturity-status, SLJ was the best strength/power predictor with the highest proportion of variance (12–47%) for balance (i.e., Stork eyes opened) and the YBT was the best balance predictor with the highest proportion of variance (43–78%) for all strength/power variables.

Conclusion:

The associations between balance and muscle strength/power measures in youth athletes that increase with maturity may imply transfer effects from balance to strength/power training and vice versa in youth athletes.

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Louise Davis and Sophia Jowett

The present preliminary study aimed to develop and examine the psychometric properties of a new sport-specific self-report instrument designed to assess athletes’ and coaches’ attachment styles. The development and initial validation comprised three main phases. In Phase 1, a pool of items was generated based on pre-existing self-report attachment instruments, modified to reflect a coach and an athlete’s style of attachment. In Phase 2, the content validity of the items was assessed by a panel of experts. A final scale was developed and administered to 405 coaches and 298 athletes (N = 703 participants). In Phase 3, confirmatory factor analysis of the obtained data was conducted to determine the final items of the Coach-Athlete Attachment Scale (CAAS). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed acceptable goodness of ft indexes for a 3-first order factor model as well as a 2-first order factor model for both the athlete and the coach data, respectively. A secure attachment style positively predicted relationship satisfaction, while an insecure attachment style was a negative predictor of relationship satisfaction. The CAAS revealed initial psychometric properties of content, factorial, and predictive validity, as well as reliability.

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John B. Nezlek, Marzena Cypryańska, Piotr Cypryański, Karolina Chlebosz, Karolina Jenczylik, Joanna Sztachańska and Anna M. Zalewska

examine such relationships. Participants in this study were recreational runners. Each week for 3 months they described how often and how far they had run that week, and they provided measures of their well-being. The analyses focused on within-person relationships between how much a person ran each week

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Irineu Loturco, Lucas A. Pereira, Ciro Winckler, Weverton L. Santos, Ronaldo Kobal and Michael McGuigan

The load–velocity relationship is widely recognized for its ability to accurately predict the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) in both lower-body and upper-body exercises. 1 – 3 With the data generated by linear-regression models, practitioners can frequently monitor and adjust the resistance

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Jesús J. Ruiz-Navarro, Pedro G. Morouço and Raúl Arellano

effectively apply force in the water and is highly associated with performance. On the contrary, the intracyclic velocity variation ( dv ) is one of the most applied parameters by academics and practitioners to evaluate the efficiency of swimmers, even though the relationship with performance is not

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Victoria McGee and J.D. DeFreese

individuals through both good and bad sport-related experiences ( Jowett & Shanmugam, 2016 ; Jowett & Wylleman, 2006 ). Thus, a deeper understanding of the impact the coach-athlete relationship has on specific athlete psychological outcomes including athlete burnout and engagement has potential theoretical

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Claire J. Brady, Andrew J. Harrison, Eamonn P. Flanagan, G. Gregory Haff and Thomas M. Comyns

athlete’s maximum strength capabilities, and these tests can measure variables such as peak force, RFD, and impulse. 5 The relationship between maximum strength measured during the IMTP/ISqT and sprint performance has been examined among male soccer and rugby players. 6 – 8 There appear to be

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Tammy Horne and Albert V. Carron

Three major issues were examined in the present study: (a) the variables discriminating between compatible and incompatible coach-athlete dyads; (b) the relationship between coach-athlete compatibility and athlete performance; and (c) the relationship between compatibility and athlete satisfaction. Subjects were 77 coach-athlete dyads from female intercollegiate teams. Compatibility was assessed using a sport-adapted version of Schutz's (1966) Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO-B) scale and Chelladurai and Saleh's (1980) Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS). Self-ratings of the quality of the coach-athlete relationship, athlete performance, and satisfaction with the coach's leadership were obtained. There were two variables that significantly discriminated between compatible and incompatible dyads. The sole variable predicting athletes' performance perceptions was the score reflecting discrepancy between athlete perceptions and preferences on the LSS reward dimension. Variables predicting athlete satisfaction were discrepancy between athlete perceptions and preferences on the LSS dimensions of training, reward, and social support. Recommendations for future research in this area are discussed.

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Christopher R. Hill, Deborah L. Feltz, Stephen Samendinger and Karin A. Pfeiffer

the literature have also highlighted the importance of varying types of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship to PA during both childhood and adolescence ( Van Der Horst, Paw, Twisk, & Van Mechelen, 2007 ; Voskuil & Robbins, 2015 ). However, the literature examining BSE beliefs in adolescents is

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Teun van Erp, Carl Foster and Jos J. de Koning

) or the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) to quantify TL. Heart rate is frequently used to determine TL because the technology is widely available, noninvasive, and inexpensive. The use of HR monitoring during exercise is based on the nearly linear relationship between HR and oxygen consumption