Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "sociological perspectives" x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
Clear All
Restricted access

Dan Goodley

What do disability labels give us and what do they steal from us? How possible is it to live our lives without categories when life is necessarily categorical? In this brief provocation, I want to explore the disability labels through recourse to three perspectives that have much to say about categorization, disability, and the human condition: the biopsychological, the biopolitical, and, what I term, an in-between-all politics. It is my view that disability categories intervene in the world in some complex and often contradictory ways. One way of living with contradictions is to work across disciplinary boundaries, thus situating ourselves across divides and embracing uncertainty and contradiction to enhance all our lives. I will conclude with some interdisciplinary thoughts for the field of adapted physical activity.

Restricted access

Maureen Connolly and William J. Harvey

Critical pedagogy owes much of its emergence, development, and ongoing relevance to the work of Paulo Freire whose legacy remains relevant for a next generation of scholars who seek to explore issues of inclusion, oppression, social justice, and authentic expression. An interdisciplinary dialogue between critical pedagogy and adapted physical activity is timely, appropriate, and should focus on complex profiles of neurodiversity, mental illness, and mental health, with emphasis on pedagogic practices of practitioners in service delivery and teacher educators who prepare them for professional practice. A case-based scenario approach is used to present practitioner and teacher educator practices. Concrete examples are provided for analyzing and understanding deeper issues and challenges related to neurodiversity in a variety of embodied dimensions in educational and activity contexts. We work with Szostak’s approach to interdisciplinary research and model an analysis strategy that integrates and applies the methodological features of interdisciplinarity, adapted physical activity, and critical pedagogy.

Restricted access

Fiona Moola, Caroline Fusco and Joel A. Kirsh

Despite the benefits of physical activity for youth with congenital heart disease (CHD), most patients are inactive. Although literature has addressed medical and psychological barriers to participation, little is known about the social barriers that youth encounter. This qualitative study explored sociocultural barriers to physical activity from the perspective of 17 youth with CHD. The main theme, “what I wish you knew,” was related to all other themes-youths’ efforts to resolve “disclosure dilemmas,” the barriers they encounter during physical education, and their struggle to understand themselves as normal. The participants’ narratives illuminate the centrality of their sociocultural world to physical activity. The findings call on researchers and educators to attend to the social and cultural environments where these youth live and play.

Restricted access

Danielle Peers, Nancy Spencer-Cavaliere and Lindsay Eales

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly (APAQ) currently mandates that authors use person-first language in their publications. In this viewpoint article, we argue that although this policy is well intentioned, it betrays a very particular cultural and disciplinary approach to disability: one that is inappropriate given the international and multidisciplinary mandate of the journal. Further, we contend that APAQ’s current language policy may serve to delimit the range of high-quality articles submitted and to encourage both theoretical inconsistency and the erasure of the ways in which research participants self-identify. The article begins with narrative accounts of each of our negotiations with disability terminology in adapted physical activity research and practice. We then provide historical and theoretical contexts for person-first language, as well as various other widely circulated alternative English-language disability terminology. We close with four suggested revisions to APAQ’s language policy.

Restricted access

Maureen M. Smith

As women age, society assigns stereotypes that suggest that older women are no longer capable of being competent athletes. In considering the experiences of older women in sport from a sociological perspective, this article provides a short summary of works examining older women in masters sport settings, as well as three brief case studies of older women engaged in sport and movement. As American women age, more of them will have experienced organized high school sport (after the passage of Title IX), suggesting that the experiences of older women in sport will take on new dimensions and meanings worthy of exploration.

Restricted access

Trevor Williams and Tarja Kolkka

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the structural functionalist sociological perspective in a disability sport inquiry. A study of socialization into wheelchair basketball is used to show how the ontological and epistemological assumptions of structural functionalism underlie decisions about the research problem and subproblems, data collection method, explanation of the results, and conclusion. Wheelchair basketball is conceptualized as a social system, and socialization as a process that ensures pattern maintenance within the system. A critique is offered of how the perspective has been interpreted in the disability sport literature, its capacity to incorporate variance, and theoretical and heuristic utility for examining disability sports.

Restricted access

Christoph Buck, Anca Bolbos and Sven Schneider

The sociological perspective postulating that contextual factors, such as the immediate residential environment, are of key importance to the health of the inhabitants is now widely investigated. Consequently, many studies are now available that focus on the topic of “deprivation amplification

Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards, Wesley J. Wilson, Steven K. Holland and Justin A. Haegele

sociological perspective focused on teachers’ workplace experiences that combines elements of occupational socialization theory and role theory. Individuals are believed to develop subjective theories ( Grotjahn, 1991 ) or personal understandings of what it means to teach through their formative experiences as

Restricted access

Karen S. Meaney and Sonya L. Armstrong

). Institutional betrayal: Inequity, discrimination, bullying, and retaliation in academia . Sociological Perspectives, 61 ( 1 ), 5 – 13 . doi:10.1177/0731121417743816 10.1177/0731121417743816 Raineri , E. , Frear , D. & Edmonds , J. ( 2011 ). An examination of the academic reach of faculty and

Restricted access

Øyvind F. Standal, Tor Erik H. Nyquist and Hanne H. Mong

parallel with that of other European countries, such as Germany, albeit with the difference in choice of terminology (health sport in Norway) was different. Conceptual Framework The conceptual framework for the study is a sociological perspective on professions. Profession is a contested concept, and there