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Jeffrey Martin

The ideal sport psychology career is not going to be something you apply for in a newspaper advertisement. It will never happen. . . . But you’re going to have to create it yourself. ( Simons & Andersen, 1995 , p. 462) There are only a few individuals in the entire United States who maintain full

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Jeffrey J. Martin

The purpose of this brief commentary is to correct some misinformation that appears in many sport psychology writings. As the title of this paper indicates, I discuss two historical giants in social psychology, Norman Triplett and Kurt Lewin, who are often cited in sport psychology publications

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Diane L. Gill

clear focus on sport psychology emerged in the 1920s with the research and applied work of Coleman Griffith ( 1925 , 1930 ) in the United States, Peter Roudik in Russia, R.W. Schulte in Germany, and a few others around the world. Sport psychology was not an organized field then, and Griffith’s early

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Ted M. Butryn, Nicole M. LaVoi, Kerri J. Kauer, Tamar Z. Semerjian and Jennifer J. Waldron

Over the past decade, a growing number of scholars in sport psychology and sport sociology have begun forging inter- and transdiciplinary research lines that attempt to follow Ingham, Blissmer, and Wells Davidson’s (1998) call for a coming together of the sport sociological and sport psychological imaginations. This paper presents the results of a thematic analysis of the stories of five early-to midcareer academics who have lived at/through the boundaries of these two sub disciplines of Kinesiology. Following an introduction in which we attempt to situate the two subdisciplines within the larger field of Kinesiology, we present a thematic analysis of the five individual stories, and attempt to tie them to the politicized boundaries and related spaces of tensions faced by those wishing to do the kind of interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary work advocated recently by the emerging areas of cultural sport psychology (CSP) and physical cultural studies (PCS).

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Robin S. Vealey

The provocative and dynamic interrelationships between the social organization of sport, sexual orientation of women participants, and their concomitant perceptions and behavior represent a fertile area for social psychological research. Sport psychologists have largely avoided, through scholarly discourse, examining lesbianism in sport thereby perpetuating “the silence so loud that it screams.” The purpose of this paper is to identify the harmful intellectual and social consequences of this silence and to advance suggestions for future research directions based on emerging epistemology and theory. It is argued that if the silence is broken using depoliticized functionalist approaches such as sex-role identification and liberal humanism, this will only exacerbate the homophobia and heterosexism that hinders our intellectual pursuit of knowledge in this area and reify the heteropatricarchal oppression of lesbians participating in sport. The rigid socially-constructed isomorphism between sport and masculinity coupled with the social stigma of lesbianism within sport may only be transformed via a paradigmatic shift from traditional functionalism toward a social constructionist approach.

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Peter M. Hopsicker and Douglas Hochstetler

In this paper, we ethically examine the value of dichotomies to the endurance community or any sports community bifurcated by attitudes of superiority in one qualitative method of experiencing an activity over another—as Pearl Izumi's 2007 advertising campaign “We are not joggers” has done by dividing the bipedal ambulatory endurance community into “runners” and “joggers.” Using the writings of American pragmatists William James and John Dewey, we will describe the endurance sports community in terms of “unsympathetic characters” and “sympathetic characters.” We will then layer conceptions of the “static” self and the “dynamic” self on top of this dichotomy. The results of this examination will not support Pearl Izumi's dichotomy in “static” ways. However, if these perspectives are viewed as exemplifying a temporal measure of the “dynamic” self, as part of the endurance athletes' personal narratives, then actions and attitudes based on these dichotomies can be seen as part of meaningful personal and community growth as well as a potential source of virtue.

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Inhyang Choi, Damian Haslett, Javier Monforte and Brett Smith

on the South Korean context, acknowledging the cultural perspective seems relevant and timely. Following this reasoning, we adopted a Cultural Sport Psychology (CSP) approach. A CSP approach emphasizes different cultural values (e.g., how people think and interact with other people) and personal