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Tywan G. Martin, Jessica Wallace, Young Ik Suh, Kysha Harriell and Justin Tatman

A number of media reports have surfaced over the last couple of years citing many concerns about sport-related concussion (SRC) and its short- and long-term consequences. In particular, American football has received a significant amount of media coverage in this area. Published empirical studies

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Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, Megan N. Houston and Cailee E. Welch

Concussions resulting from sports and recreational activities are a significant concern in the pediatric population. The number of children and adolescents sustaining sport-related concussions is increasing and, as a result, legislation has been passed in all 50 states to ensure appropriate recognition and referral of pediatric athletes following concussion. The developing brain may make the diagnosis, assessment, and management of concussion more challenging for health care providers and requires the use of specific age-appropriate assessment tools. Concussion management must also include considerations for cognitive and physical rest, a collaborative concussion management team that includes medical and school personnel, and more conservative stepwise progressions for returning to school and to physical activity.

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Kevin Guskiewicz and Elizabeth Teel

In order to promote the most successful outcomes following concussion, a multifaceted team of individuals is required for appropriate injury diagnosis and management. This review explores the primary roles of sports medicine personnel in the concussion diagnosis and management process. We will discuss the psychometric properties, including sensitivity, specificity, and clinical utility, of on-field/sideline, laboratory, and neurophysiological assessment tools. Additionally, we will discuss the roles of other kinesiology experts in concussion management and recovery, and their importance to concussion research. By developing a thorough and consistent roadmap for concussion management, clinicians and researchers will be capable of providing athletes with the most successful outcomes.

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Nikolaus A. Dean

personal narratives with Erving Goffman’s ( 1959 ) presentation of self theory. Through this application, I attempt to analyze and make sense of the (re)negotiation of my athletic identity due to the formidable impacts of sustaining a sport-related concussion (SRC). As Brewer, Van Raalte, and Linder ( 1993

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Tracey Covassin, Kyle M. Petit and Morgan Anderson

Sport-related concussion (SRC) is a public health concern that has received increased research attention over the past decade. This paper is a review of recent literature on SRCs in youth athletes age 5–18 years. We focus on six key areas: concussion overview (e.g., definition, signs

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Kevin M. Guskiewicz

“Concussion” is all over the news, and—yes—it has implications for combating chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Many parents are pushing their children away from collision sports such as football, hockey, and lacrosse because they fear the risk of chronic neurodegenerative problems later in life. However, there is good logic in emphasizing the importance of physical activities such as collision type sports, during the developmental years. Physical educators, researchers, policy makers, and coaches must work together to encourage safe play and rules changes that can keep youth and adolescents active in sports that build character, discipline, and teach teamwork. Understanding the complexity of the highly adaptable adolescent brain both prior to and following sport-related concussion is critically important in accomplishing this goal.

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Introduction Introduction to the Special Issue: Concussion Management in Sport Maureen R. Weiss * 5 2015 4 2 129 130 10.1123/kr.2015-0013 Original Research A Pediatric Perspective on Sport-Related Concussion Tamara C. Valovich McLeod * Megan N. Houston * Cailee E. Welch * 5 2015 4 2 131 155

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Paul M. Pedersen

championships) balances tradition and commercialism, how media coverage of sport-related concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy influences public perceptions, and how the media and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, with signage for its organizational headquarters featured in the

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Alexander J. Bedard, Kevin A. Bigelman, Lynn R. Fielitz, Jeffrey D. Coelho, William B. Kobbe, Renard O. Barone, Nicholas H. Gist and John E. Palmer

. ( 2000 ). The social practice of self-defense martial arts: Applications for physical education . Quest, 52 , 246 – 259 . doi:10.1080/00336297.2000.10491713 10.1080/00336297.2000.10491713 Daneshvar , D.H. , Nowinski , C.J. , McKee , A.C. , & Cantu , R.C. ( 2011 ). The epidemiology of sport-related

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Dominic Malcolm

Sport-related concussion (SRC) has become an increasingly acute medical and social problem. While the limitations of such quantitative assessments are discussed below, indicatively it is believed that each year there are 1.6–3.8 million SRCs in the United States ( Nathanson et al., 2016 ) and 2