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Adam Beard, John Ashby, Ryan Chambers, Franck Brocherie and Grégoire P. Millet

This may have good carryover to rugby union, which has a high number of repeated-sprint requirements. 2 Although RSA training is well accepted to improve this quality, 5 utilizing RSA in hypoxic conditions (the so-called “repeated-sprint training in hypoxia,” [RSH]) has shown superior results when

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Beatriz Bachero-Mena, Miguel Sánchez-Moreno, Fernando Pareja-Blanco and Borja Sañudo

) the maximal velocity. 4 In a recent review, Alcaraz et al 5 suggested that resisted sprint training is an effective method for the development of sprint performance, mainly in the early acceleration phase (≤10 m), with little impact in the maximum velocity phase (≥20 m). Energy for muscle

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Jorge Carlos-Vivas, Jorge Perez-Gomez, Ola Eriksrud, Tomás T. Freitas, Elena Marín-Cascales and Pedro E. Alcaraz

velocity, and applied forces. Thus, it is not surprising that training routines in soccer include training methods that involve specific motor tasks, such as resisted sprint training (RST) or plyometrics. RST has been shown as an effective training method for enhancing performance, where athletes sprint

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Massimo Venturelli, David Bishop and Lorenzo Pettene

Young soccer players are usually trained with adult-training methods, even though the physiological adaptations are likely to be very different compared with adults. In contrast, some have suggested training preadolescents only with coordination training. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether coordination or repeated-sprint training better improved speed over 20 m, with and without the ball. Sixteen soccer players (mean age 11 ± 0.5 y) were randomly assigned to a sprint-training group (STG = 7) or a coordination-training group (CTG = 9). The STG trained twice a week for 12 wk and performed 20 repetitions of 20- and 10-m sprints; the CTG performed coordination training (eg, speed ladder running) for the same training duration. Maximal jump height, anthropometric measures, and 20-m sprint time, with and without ball, were evaluated before and after the training period. Statistical significance was determined using two-way ANOVA with repeated measure and Pearson test for correlation. Both groups improved speed without the ball: STG = 3.75 ± 0.10 s to 3.66 ± 0.09 s (P < .05); CTG = 3.64 ± 0.13 s to 3.56 ± 0.13 s (P < .05), with no difference between groups. Sprint time with the ball pre- and posttraining was 4.06 ± 0.11 s and 4.05 ± 0.19 s (P > .05) for STG and 4.04 ± 0.12 s and 3.82 ± 0.15 s (P < .05) for CTG, with a significant difference between groups posttraining (P < .05). There were significant correlations between sprint time without ball, CMJ, and SJ. These data suggest that coordination training increases the speed with the ball more than typical repeated-sprint training. It can be hypothesized that running speed with ball improved more in CTG because this particular action requires improvements in coordination.

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Amador García-Ramos, Alejandro Torrejón, Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, Antonio J. Morales-Artacho and Slobodan Jaric

–V parameters can be detected by the recently developed 2-point method. To address the problems discussed herein, we explored the feasibility of the F–V modeling approach to detect selective changes in the mechanical capacities of the lower-body muscles associated with a sprint-training program conducted on a

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Pedro L. Valenzuela, Guillermo Sánchez-Martínez, Elaia Torrontegi, Javier Vázquez-Carrión, Manuela González, Zigor Montalvo and Grégoire P. Millet

Repeated-sprint ability is a major determinant of performance in intermittent sports (eg, team and racket sports). 1 Repeated-sprint training (RS) has shown to be effective for performance enhancement in these sports, increasing maximal oxygen uptake and peak and mean speed during a repeated

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Shaun J. McLaren, Jonathan M. Taylor, Tom W. Macpherson, Iain R. Spears and Matthew Weston

dose–response sensitivity of perceived respiratory (central) and muscular (peripheral) exertion in relation to external loads and changes in fitness is largely unexplored. Repeated-sprint training (RST) is a time-efficient and centrally and peripherally demanding exercise modality that is effective at

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Jonathan M. Taylor, Tom W. Macpherson, Shaun J. McLaren, Iain Spears and Matthew Weston

Purpose:

To compare the effects of 2 repeated-sprint training programs on fitness in soccer.

Methods:

Fifteen semiprofessional soccer players (age: 24 ± 4 y; body mass: 77 ± 8 kg) completed 6 repeated-sprint training sessions over a 2-week period. Players were assigned to a straight-line (STR) (n = 8; 3–4 sets of 7 × 30 m) or change of direction (CoD) (n = 7; 3–4 sets of 7 × 20-m) repeated-sprint training group. Performance measures included 5-, 10-, and 20-m sprints, countermovement jump, Illinois agility, and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (YYIRTL1) performance. Internal (heart rate) and external (global positioning system-derived measures) training loads were monitored throughout. Data were analyzed using magnitude-based inferences.

Results:

Internal and external loads were higher in the STR group than in the CoD group with large differences in maximum velocity (28.7%; ±90% confidence limits, 3.3%), moderate differences in mean heart rates (7.0%; ±1.4%) and PlayerLoad (17.6%; ±8.6%), and small differences in peak heart rates (3.0%; ±1.6%). Large improvements in 5-m (STR: 9.6%; ±7.0% and CoD: 9.4%; ±3.3%), 10-m (STR: 6.6%; ±4.6% and CoD: 6.7%; ±2.2%), and 20-m (STR: 3.6; ±4.0% and CoD: 4.0; ±1.7%) sprints were observed. Large and moderate improvements in YYIRTL1 performance were observed in the STR (24.0%; ±9.3%) and CoD (31.0%; ±7.5%), respectively. Between-groups differences in outcome measures were unclear.

Conclusions:

Two weeks of repeated-sprint training stimulates improvements in acceleration, speed, and high-intensity running performance in soccer players. Despite STR inducing higher internal and external training loads, training adaptations were unclear between training modes, indicating a need for further research.

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Laurent B. Seitz, Matt Barr and G. Gregory Haff

Purpose:

To compare the effects of sprint training with or without ball carry on the sprint performance of elite rugby league players.

Methods:

Twenty-four elite rugby league players were divided into a ball-carry group (BC; n = 12) and a no-ball-carry group (NBC; n = 12). The players of the BC group were required to catch and carry the ball under 1 arm during each sprint, whereas the NBC group performed sprints without carrying a ball. The 8-wk training intervention took place during the precompetitive phase of the season and consisted of 2 sessions/wk. Sprint performance was measured before and after the training intervention with 40-m linear sprints performed under 2 conditions: with and without ball carry. Split times of 10, 20, and 40 m were recorded for further analysis. A 3-way (group × time × condition) factorial ANOVA was performed to compare changes in sprint performance with and without the ball, before and after the training intervention for both BC and NBC training groups.

Results:

The BC and NBC groups experienced similar improvements in 10-, 20-, and 40-m sprint times and accelerations, regardless of the condition under which the sprint tests were performed (P = .19).

Conclusions:

Sprint training while carrying a rugby ball is as effective as sprint training without carrying a rugby ball for improving the sprint performance of elite rugby league players.

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Live S. Luteberget, Truls Raastad, Olivier Seynnes and Matt Spencer

Fast acceleration is an important performance factor in handball. In addition to traditional sprint training (TST), resisted-sprint training (RST) is a method often used to improve acceleration. However, studies on RST show conflicting results, and underlying mechanisms have not been studied.

Purpose:

To compare the effects of RST, by sled towing, against TST on sprint performance and muscle architecture.

Methods:

Participants (n = 18) were assigned to either RST or TST and completed 2 training sessions of RST or TST per week (10 wk), in addition to their normal team training. Sprint tests (10 and 30 m) and measurements of muscle architecture were performed pre- and posttraining.

Results:

Beneficial effects were found in the 30-m-sprint test for both groups (mean; ±90% CL: TST = −0.31; ±0.19 s, RST = −0.16; ±0.13 s), with unclear differences between the groups. Only TST had a beneficial effect on 10-m time (−0.04; ±0.04 s), with a likely difference between the 2 groups (85%, ES = 0.60). Both groups had a decrease in pennation angle (−6.0; ±3.3% for TST and −2.8; ±2.0% for RST), which had a nearly perfect correlation with percentage change in 10-m-sprint performance (r = .92). A small increase in fascicle length (5.3; ±3.9% and 4.0; ±2.1% for TST and RST, respectively) was found, with unclear differences between groups.

Discussion:

TST appears to be more effective than RST in enhancing 10-m-sprint time. Both groups showed similar effects in 30-m-sprint time. A similar, yet small, effect of sprint training on muscle architecture was observed in both groups.