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Dolores A. Christensen and Mark W. Aoyagi

The literature on the practice of sport and performance psychology (SPP) is lacking in recent contributions from student practitioners despite previous calls for additional contributions (Holt & Strean, 2001; Tonn & Harmison, 2004). A recent graduate from a master’s degree program in SPP was invited to attend USA Swimming 2012 Olympic Team Trials as a member of the support staff for the club swim team she had been consulting with for the duration of her graduate training. The focus of this paper is to expand upon this gap in the literature by providing a first-hand account of a young practitioner’s experiences at a high-performance meet. The neophyte consultant’s use of supervision for personal and professional preparation for Olympic trials, her experiences there, including ethical dilemmas encountered, and the lessons learned from attending such an event so early in her career will be discussed. Future implications are also offered for graduate students and early career professionals in SPP.

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Urban Johnson and Mark Andersen

.F. ( 2012 ). Stress, coping, and barriers to wellness among psychology graduate students . Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 6 , 122 – 134 . doi:10.1037/a0028768 10.1037/a0028768 Fitzpatrick , S.J. , Monda , S.J. , & Wooding , C.B. ( 2016 ). Great expectations: Career planning

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Robin S. Vealey, Robin Cooley, Emma Nilsson, Carly Block and Nick Galli

measures is prohibitive Lack of Reliability   Athletes don’t know themselves well enough to answer Table 6 Biggest Needs to Enhance Assessment in Applied Interventions Training in Assessment Student training Coursework and practica involving assessment     Student training in neurofeedback assessment

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Chad Seifried, Chris Barnhill and J. Michael Martinez

opportunities and generating new knowledge. First, the traditional approach suggests that faculty can center doctoral student training on the general foundational disciplines that make up a field, with specialization coming through doctoral advising in a particular subdiscipline ( Mudambi, et al., 2012 ). Under

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Ang Chen, Bo Shen and Xihe Zhu

choice of methods, rather than the other way around. For years, Ennis insisted that our graduate students master both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. She crafted a graduate student training program for students to receive a certificate in statistics and a qualitative methods course