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Christian C. Evans and Sandra L. Cassady

Objective:

To describe the underlying conditions that predispose athletes to sudden cardiac death (SCD) and review signs and symptoms that indicate an athlete is at risk.

Data Sources:

MEDLINE, the Los Angeles Times and Triathlon Times archives, and other sources identified in the references of articles initially located therein. A total of 43 references were included.

Conclusions:

Most cases of SCD in younger athletes (≤35 years) are attributable to multiple hereditary conditions, with familial hyper-trophic cardiomyopathy being the primary cause, whereas the major cause of SCD in older athletes (>35 years) is coronary artery disease. Health-care professionals evaluating athletes should pay particular attention to past medical and family history. Items in an athlete’s screening that suggest increased risk include a history of chest pain, syncope, excessive shortness of breath, irregular heart rate or murmur, or a history of SCD in an immediate family member.

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Thomas Terrell, John Pitt and Irfan Asif

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Robert L. Kronisch

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Julianna Shappy

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Gary Allen, Kristy Smith, Brady Tripp, Jason Zaremski and Seth Smith

Key Points ▸ Coronary artery anomalies are among the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. ▸ Coronary artery anomalies are rarely identified on preparticipation screening. ▸ Patients can possibly return to sport with appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Sudden death in young, competitive athletes

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Anthony Rossi, Tina Claiborne and Jamie Fetter

Key Points ▸ Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of sudden death in young athletes and occurs three times more often in athletes than in nonathletes. ▸ Physical exams, personal history, and family history alone may not be enough to identify risk factors. ▸ Of patients with SCD, 80% are

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Anthony Rossi, Tina Claiborne and Jamie Fetter

standard of care. Research shows that 80% of patients who suffer sudden cardiac death are asymptomatic until cardiac arrest occurs. This may suggest that screening by history and physical examination alone is insufficient to identify athletes with life-threatening cardiac conditions. 10 The cardiac

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Christian C. Evans, Lisa Schwarz and Minal Masihi

Context:

Sudden cardiac death in athletes may be preventable if healthcare providers perform a thorough screening of the cardiovascular system during routine athlete evaluations.

Objective:

Determine the adequacy of routine screening of athletes for heart disease by athletic trainers (ATs) and physical therapists (PTs).

Design, Participants, Setting, and Methods:

National Athletic Trainers Association and Sports Physical Therapy Section members were surveyed using a stratified sampling technique via e-mail and postal mail.

Results:

ATs performed significantly higher than PTs on the composite screening score (CSS; mean of 13 items) as well as on 9 of 13 individual items. Logistic regression analysis revealed that “involvement in preparticipation screenings for sports (PPSS)” was most closely related to CSS (P < .01) and controlling for this factor in the ANOVA eliminated differences between the professions.

Conclusions:

Clinicians working with athletes who are not involved in PPSS may not adequately screen these patients for heart disease.

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articles for this quiz can be found in this issue of IJATT . Choose the best answer for each question. THIS IS JUST A PAPER VERSION FOR YOUR PERUSAL: YOU MUST TAKE THIS QUIZ ONLINE. 1. As noted by Allen et al., an anomalous right coronary artery (ARCA) more often leads to sudden cardiac death than an

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Kelly L. Holzberger, Kim Keeley and Martin Donahue

tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden cardiac death. 3 , 4 For this reason, healthcare providers, especially those caring for active patients, must be educated about the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of SVT. Currently, the literature is lacking case reports demonstrating the effective