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Kelsey L. Boulé and Courtney W. Mason

management, and as a tourist activity. Previous studies have investigated the history of sport hunting, 7 the sustainability of land and animal resources, 8 and the effects of hunting tourism on the environment and local economies. 9 Although some research highlights the motivational factors that entice

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Brian P. McCullough, Madeleine Orr and Timothy Kellison

. They have done so through the lenses of sport sustainability ( Chard & Mallen, 2012 ; Kellison & Hong, 2015 ; Mallen, Adams, Stevens, & Thompson, 2010 ), corporate social responsibility ( Casper, Pfahl, & McSherry, 2012 ; Inoue & Kent, 2012a , 2012b ; Trendafilova et al., 2014 ), and sport

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jay johnson and Adam Ehsan Ali

turn, the organization has won numerous awards for its efforts towards more sustainable operating practices. Most recently, this included earning the 2015 Green Power Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its strategy, leadership, and impact on the “green power market

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Brian P. McCullough, Madeleine Orr and Nicholas M. Watanabe

demonstrates a commitment on behalf of these organizations to support the Paris Agreement and work toward solutions to reduce the effects of human activity on the natural environment (i.e., climate change). The sport sector is not exempt from the responsibility to address environmental sustainability ( Sartore

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Stefan Walzel, Jonathan Robertson and Christos Anagnostopoulos

), (d) different forms of CSR engagement, such as environmental sustainability ( Inoue & Kent, 2012a , 2012b ; Trendafilova, Babiak, & Heinze, 2013 ) and community development ( Trendafilova et al., 2017 ), and (e) perceptions and attitudes of key stakeholders, such as consumers ( Blumrodt, Bryson

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Brian D. Clocksin and Margo B. Greicar

Community engagement is commonly imbedded in the ethos of institutions of higher education and has been identified as a High Impact Practice for student learning and retention. The Sustained Engagement Experiences in Kinesiology (SEEK) program at the University of La Verne is a curriculum-wide approach that moves students through four stages of community engagement: Respect, Participating with Effort, Self-Directions, and Leadership. The stages are developmentally sequenced across the curriculum and provide opportunities for learners to move from passive participants to active engagement scholars. The engagement experiences serve to enhance students’ abilities to transfer what they learn in the classroom to real-life problems, foster an asset-based approach to community engagement, and facilitate a transition from surface-to deep-learning.

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Dorene Ciletti, John Lanasa, Diane Ramos, Ryan Luchs and Junying Lou

Based on a review of North American professional sports teams, this study provides insight on how teams are communicating commitment to sustainability principles and practices on their Web sites. Web sites for 126 teams across 4 different leagues were examined for content relative to triple-bottom-line dimensions. Global Reporting Initiative indicator codes and definitions were constructs for the model and aligned to social, environmental, and economic principles for categories of sustainability practices. Although teams are including sustainability information on their Web sites, the vast majority downplay economic issues and highlight social issues on their home pages and subsequent pages; communication about environmental factors varies by league. The study shows differences across leagues and suggests that although some teams are communicating a commitment to sustainability, others may not be considering stakeholder perceptions of their Web-site communications or whether sustainability efforts affect public consumption of league offerings or attitudes toward professional sports.

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Danny O’Brien and Jess Ponting

This research analyzes a strategic approach to managing surf tourism in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Surf tourists travel to often remote destinations for the purpose of riding surfboards, and earlier research suggests the mismanagement of surf tourism in some destinations has resulted in significant deleterious impacts on host communities. The research question in this study addresses how surf tourism can be managed to achieve sustainable host community benefits in the context of a developing country. Primary data came from semistructured interviews and participant observation. The findings demonstrate how sport governing bodies can engage host communities in a collaborative framework for the sustainable utilization of sport tourism resources. The derived knowledge from this research may decrease host communities’ reliance on less sustainable commercial activities, and inform policy and practice on sustainable approaches to using sport tourism for community building and poverty alleviation.

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Jonathan Casper, Michael Pfahl and Mark McSherry

The relationship of sport to sustainability management is relatively unknown. Despite the increasing recognition of the growing role of athletics in regard to environmental sustainability, it remains unclear what role athletics departments have with regard to environmental action and what is currently being done now. The purpose of this study is to examine American intercollegiate athletics department personnel in relation to their organization’s sustainability practices, organizational strategies, and personal perspectives at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) universities. Athletics department members (N = 97) who were most responsible for sustainability initiatives responded to a survey designed to assess awareness levels and concern for environmental issues and the strategies and practices at work in their respective athletics departments. Findings based on prioritization, planning, decision-making, and use of initiatives using frequencies and means are reported. Differences, using t tests were also compared based on BCS or non-BCS standing. Results show that although environmental concern is high, there is disconnect between concern and action perhaps due to a lack of communication between the athletics department and the general university, cost concerns, and a lack of knowledge about sustainability initiatives. Implications related to the need for better communication between the athletics department/university and improved planning and prioritization is discussed.

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Dennis L. Smart and Richard A. Wolfe

This paper addresses the determinants of intercollegiate athletic program success. We built our arguments on a recent development in the strategic management literature, the Resource-Based View (RBV) of the firm. Our purpose was to investigate the source of sustainable intercollegiate athletic program success. In making our arguments, we briefly reviewed the RBV literature and addressed appropriate success criteria for intercollegiate athletics programs. An exploratory investigation of Pennsylvania State University's football program led to the conclusion that the resources responsible for its enduring competitive advantage are the history, relationships, trust, and organizational culture that have developed within the program's coaching staff. An organization that possesses such organizational resources may sustain a competitive advantage by exploiting its human and physical resources more completely than other organizations. The paper concludes with discussions of the potential generalizability of our findings, their implications for theory and practice, and suggested future research directions.