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Ole Winthereik Mathorne, Kristoffer Henriksen and Natalia Stambulova

In Denmark, sport management and talent development rely on the collaboration between talent-development stakeholders and organizations in an athletic-talent-development environment. Guided by the holistic ecological approach (HEA) in talent development ( Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017 ; Henriksen

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Richard Bailey and David Collins

Despite evident differences between approaches to talent development, many share a set of common characteristics and presumptions. We call this the Standard Model of Talent Development (SMTD). This model is articulated and the relevant literature drawn out to highlight the model's strengths and weaknesses. The SMTD has been enormously influential, in terms of both policy documentation and practice, and it retains an obvious common sense appeal. However, we will argue that not only is its attractiveness illusionary and inconsistent to the emerging evidence base from research, but it is also undesirable from a variety of perspectives and desired outcomes. In short, we suggest that the most common system for identifying talent is unsubstantiated from both a process and an outcome perspective.

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Kristoffer Henriksen, Natalia Stambulova and Kirsten Kaya Roessler

The holistic ecological approach to talent development in sport highlights the central role of the overall environment as it affects a prospective elite athlete. This paper examines a flat-water kayak environment in Norway with a history of successfully producing top-level senior athletes from among its juniors. Principal methods of data collection include interviews, participant observations of daily life in the environment and analysis of documents. The environment was centered around the relationship between prospects and a community of elite athletes, officially organized as a school team but helping the athletes to focus on their sport goals, teaching the athletes to be autonomous and responsible for their own training, and perceived as very integrated due to a strong and cohesive organizational culture. We argue that the holistic ecological approach opens new venues in talent development research and holds the potential to change how sport psychology practitioners work with prospective elite athletes.

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Andy Hill, Áine MacNamara and Dave Collins

Talent development (TD) is widely recognized as a nonlinear and dynamic process, with psychology a key determinant of long-term success in sport. However, given the role that positive characteristics play in the TD process, there is a relative dearth of research examining the psychological characteristics that may derail development. A retrospective qualitative investigation was conducted with academy coaches and directors within rugby union (n = 15), representing nine different elite English rugby union academies, to identify both positive and negative issues that influenced TD. Comprehensive support was found for existing positive constructs as facilitators of effective development. A range of inappropriately applied ‘positive’ characteristics were identified as having a negative impact on development. Potential clinical issues were also recognized by coaches as talent derailers. It is proposed that by incorporating these potentially negative factors into existing formative assessment tools, a more effective development process can be achieved.

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Taryn K. Morgan and Peter R. Giacobbi Jr.

The purpose of this study was to utilize multiple perspectives to describe the major influences and experiences during the development of highly talented collegiate athletes. Eight NCAA Division I collegiate athletes, 12 parents, and 6 coaches participated in this study. In-depth semi-structured interviews analyzed through grounded theory analytic procedures (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) were used. Overall, it was ascertained that a favorable interaction between perceived genetic dispositions, practice, situational factors, and mental characteristics facilitated and nurtured the participants’ talent development. The importance of social support for overcoming adversity was a salient theme and should be addressed by sport psychology consultants and coaches.

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Florence Lebrun, Àine MacNamara, Dave Collins and Sheelagh Rodgers

performance and well-being has rapidly grown ( Rice et al., 2016 ; Schaal et al., 2011 ), less attention has been paid to young and developing athletes ( Hill, MacNamara, Collins, & Rodgers, 2016 ). Yet, young elite athletes involved in talent-development (TD) environments (e.g., regional/national sport

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Jamie Taylor and Dave Collins

Sport is littered with examples of gifted youngsters who fail to realize what many perceived to be their ultimate potential. Much research supports the conceptualization of talent development (TD) as a nonlinear process, and many young “superstars” can attest that early success may not necessarily

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Fleur E.C.A. van Rens, Erika Borkoles, Damian Farrow and Remco C.J. Polman

A holistic perspective on talent development in sport is important to facilitate a developmentally appropriate approach to cultivating sporting expertise ( Henriksen, 2010a ; b ; Miller & Kerr, 2002 ; Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004 ). Understanding the personal, environmental, and organizational

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Fleur E.C.A. van Rens, Rebecca A. Ashley and Andrea R. Steele

.1080/10705519909540118 Ivarsson , A. , Stenling , A. , Fallby , J. , Johnson , U. , Borg , E. , & Johansson , G. ( 2015 ). The predictive ability of the talent development environment on youth elite football players’ well-being: A person-centered approach . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 16 , 15 – 23 . doi

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Beth G. Clarkson, Elwyn Cox and Richard C. Thelwell

later in their career when ingratiated within its culture through talent development and elite levels? Due to the limited nature of investigations concerning women football coaches, researchers can look to scholarly investigations of women in non-playing support roles (e.g., coordinators, secretaries