Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 158 items for :

  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
Clear All
Restricted access

Peter F. Bodary and M. Melissa Gross

, problem solving, interpersonal skills, teamwork, scientific communication, quantitative literacy ( Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2007 ). This has also changed the teaching goals for faculty as there is a shift in the curricular priorities regarding the skills needed and the course

Restricted access

Duane Knudson and Karen Meaney

promotion of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL; Boyer, 1991 ). Over a period of decades, researchers in education and numerous other academic disciplines have conclusively reported that active-learning instructional strategies significantly improve student engagement and learning over traditional

Restricted access

Stephen M. Roth

Higher education faculty have many responsibilities, with teaching as arguably the most public of those yet also the task for which many are least prepared. Professional development around teaching and learning can provide faculty with the knowledge and skills needed to improve student learning while also improving job satisfaction. The present paper describes the use of faculty learning communities as a best practice for professional development around teaching. Such communities engage a group of participants over time and provide a way to impart knowledge and resources around teaching and learning, encourage application of new skills in the classroom, and evaluate and refect on the effectiveness of those trials. Research shows that time spent in faculty learning communities translates into improvements in both teaching effectiveness and student learning. Resources are provided for administrators interested in developing and supporting faculty learning communities around teaching and learning.

Restricted access

Melinda A. Solmon

( Ennis, 2014 ), and they enter teacher education programs with the intention of replicating the existing instructional practice. A traditional sport-based multiactivity approach to teaching physical education, especially in secondary school settings, is at the heart of the dissonance between what and how

Restricted access

Kathryn L. Davis

This review is an examination of selected literature from the past thirty years on gender equity in physical education. It is organized in terms of (1) defining the theoretical framework of gender equity, (2) the origins of gender equity in physical education from Title IX legislation, (3) the influence of teacher behavior and the curriculum in providing an equitable class environment, and (4) the applications and implications of gender equity for the physical education practitioner. Despite the well-developed research in the field of physical education about the prevalence of gender inequities exhibited by teachers, there are a few recent research studies in which the authors have failed to show this inequitable treatment. As research has progressed in this area, it is important to note that teachers may be improving in the area of equitable interactions with students of different genders. This review concludes with some suggestions for further research in the area of teaching for gender equity in physical education.

Restricted access

Danielle D. Wadsworth, Mary E. Rudisill, Jared A. Russell, James R. McDonald and David D. Pascoe

The School of Kinesiology at Auburn University unites teaching, research, and outreach efforts to provide access to physical activity for local, statewide, and global communities. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs as well as strategies to mobilize efforts for physical activity outreach within an academic setting. School-wide efforts include youth initiatives, physical activity assessments offered through our TigerFit program, and the United States Olympic Team Handball training center. All programs provide service-learning opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students as well as outreach outcomes. Furthermore, the programs provide a platform for scholarship in the form of publications, partnerships for grant submissions, and student research projects. Merging teaching, outreach, and scholarship has provided longevity for the programs, thereby establishing long-term social ties to the community and providing continued access to physical activity to promote public health.

Restricted access

D. Stanley Eitzen and Susan Hyatt-Hearn

This is a case study of the consequences of a “sport and society” course for students. Data from a pretest and posttest of one class in sport and society suggest that students changed in “desired” directions. At the conclusion of the course they tend to adopt the sociological perspective, as indicated by a greater probability of criticism rather than the acceptance of societal arrangements, a greater willingness to change social structures, and a greater tendency to consider society rather than individuals as the cause of social problems. Students also became less sexist, and the posttest indicated that the course challenged conventional wisdom and thus demythologized the social reality of sport. Since this study was of one class, the results are tentative. The paper concludes with suggestions for further study.

Restricted access

Merrill J. Melnick

Restricted access

Fiona J. Moola, Moss E. Norman, LeAnne Petherick and Shaelyn Strachan

While interdisciplinary knowledge is critical to moving beyond categorical ways of knowing, this comes with its own set of pedagogical challenges. We contend that acknowledging existing knowledge hierarchies and epistemological differences, recognizing the ideological baggage that students’ bring to the classroom in terms of their understandings of health, embracing intellectual uncertainty, and encouraging learning-as-witnessing, are fundamental to fostering an interdisciplinary pedagogy that opens up a space for dialogue between psychology and sociology. We draw on the case of obesity and physical inactivity in the Canadian context as an exemplar of a kinesiology dilemma in which both psychology and sociology have important, albeit different, roles to play. We suggest that the anxiety provoked by such an approach is not only necessary but productive to forge an intellectual space where psychologists and sociologists may better hear one another.

Restricted access

David R. Bassett, Jeffrey T. Fairbrother, Lynn B. Panton, Philip E. Martin and Ann M. Swartz

, pharmacy, dentistry, and medicine. Although this growth has benefitted the profession in many ways, it has also created a need for more faculty members and improved facilities ( Thomas, 2014 ). At many institutions, the teaching resources in kinesiology programs have not kept pace with increases in