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Emerson Franchini, Stanislaw Sterkowicz, Urszula Szmatlan-Gabrys, Tomasz Gabrys and Michal Garnys

Purpose:

This study investigated the energy system contributions of judo athletes to the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT).

Methods:

Fourteen male judo athletes performed the SJFT, which comprised three periods of judo activity (A = 15 s, B and C = 30 s) interspersed with 10 s rest intervals. During this test, one athlete threw two others positioned 6 m from each other using the ippon-seoi-nage technique. The fractions of the aerobic, anaerobic alactic and anaerobic lactic systems were calculated based on oxygen uptake, the fast component of excess postexercise oxygen uptake, and changes in net blood lactate, respectively. The contribution of the three energy systems was compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s multiple comparisons test. Compound symmetry, or sphericity, was determined by Mauchly’s test. A level of significance of 5% (P < .05) was adopted in all analyses.

Results:

The alactic energy system presented a higher (F = 20.9; P < .001; power observed = 1.0) contribution (86.8 ± 23.6 kJ; 42.3 ± 5.9%) during the test when compared with both aerobic (57.1 ± 11.3 kJ; 28.2 ± 2.9%) and lactic (58.9 ± 12.1 kJ; 29.5 ± 6.2%) energy systems (P < .001 for both comparisons).

Conclusions:

The higher alactic contribution seems to be a consequence of the high-intensity efforts performed during the test, and its intermittent nature. Thus, when using the SJFT, coaches are evaluating mainly their athletes’ anaerobic alactic system, which can be considered to be the most predominant system contributing to the actions (techniques) performed in the match.

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Billy Sperlich, Christoph Zinner, David Trenk and Hans-Christer Holmberg

Purpose:

To examine whether a 3-min all-out test can be used to obtain accurate values for the maximal lactate steady state (v MLSS) and/or peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) of well-trained runners.

Methods:

The 15 male volunteers (25 ± 5 y, 181 ± 6 cm, 76 ± 7 kg, VO2peak 69.3 ± 9.5 mL · kg−1 · min−1) performed a ramp test, a 3-min all-out test, and several submaximal 30-min runs at constant paces of v END (mean velocity during the last 30 s of the 3-min all-out test) itself and v END +0.2, +0.1, –0.1, –0.2, –0.3, or –0.4 m/s.

Results:

v MLSS and v END were correlated (r = .69, P = .004), although v MLSS was lower (mean difference: 0.26 ± 0.32 m/s, 95% CI –.44 to –.08 m/s, P = .007, effect size = 0.65). The VO2peak values derived from the ramp and 3-min all-out tests were not correlated (r = .41, P = .12), with a mean difference of 523 ± 1002 mL (95% CI –31 to 1077 mL).

Conclusion:

A 3-min all-out test does not provide a suitable measure of v MLSS or VO2peak for well-trained runners.

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Antonio Dello Iacono, Stephanie Valentin, Mark Sanderson and Israel Halperin

Sport scientists and applied practitioners regularly monitor and prescribe training programs based on assessments of force production tests. Two examples of such tests are the isometric midthigh pull (IMTP) and the isometric squat tests. 1 , 2 Both require subjects to stand on a force plate and

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Yaohui He, Phillip Ward and Xiaozan Wang

teachers content knowledge and by assessing their knowledge using written tests ( Kim, Lee, Ward, & Li, 2015 ). Ball, Thames, and Phelps ( 2008 ) in mathematics and Ward ( 2009 ) in physical education have differentiated domains of content knowledge. Ball et al. ( 2008 ) began by distinguishing between

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Kamila Grandolfi, Vandre Sosciarelli and Marcos Polito

The development of muscular strength can be measured by a 1-repetition maximum (1RM) test. 1 Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that some individuals can lift higher loads when 1RM tests are repeated between 1 and 4 days. 2 This is explained by the neural coordination between the motor

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Michael J.A. Speranza, Tim J. Gabbett, David A. Greene, Rich D. Johnston, Andrew D. Townshend and Brett O’Farrell

elements of resistance training and aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, as well as rugby-league-specific drills. All participants were free from injury and midway through a 15-week preseason training program when they undertook muscle-strength and -power testing and tackling assessments. All players

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Matheus Hausen, Pedro Paulo Soares, Marcus Paulo Araujo, Débora Esteves, Hilbert Julio, Roberto Tauil, Marcus Junca, Flávia Porto, Emerson Franchini, Craig Alan Bridge and Jonas Gurgel

2 max ) using nonspecific testing modes, such as running or cycling. The V ˙ O 2 max values obtained from these “gold-standard” testing modes range between 44 and 63 mL·kg −1 ·min −1 for elite male taekwondo athletes. 1 Although these data provide insight into taekwondo athletes

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Joel M. Garrett, Stuart R. Graham, Roger G. Eston, Darren J. Burgess, Lachlan J. Garrett, John Jakeman and Kevin Norton

It is critical that when making informed decisions regarding performance, coaches and support staff have knowledge of the typical variation or repeatability of the test being applied. 1 , 2 Gaining an understanding of the meaningful change in performance is reliant on knowing if the observed

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Summer Davis, Xihe Zhu and Justin Haegele

Physical fitness testing is a common assessment in physical education. Health-related physical fitness components such as cardiorespiratory endurance and muscular strength are important indicators for overall health and body function ( Ortega, Ruiz, Castillo, & Sjöström, 2008 ). A recent study

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Sarah Danthony, Nicolas Mascret and François Cury

Evaluations, tests, and examinations are an inevitable part of students’ lives. Although they may provide academic recognition at the end of the learning process, they also represent a threatening situation and a significant source of worry and anxiety ( Putwain, Connors, & Symes, 2010 ), with