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Damien Clement

Context:

The transtheoretical model has been widely used in the investigation of how people adapt to new behaviors; however, the literature appears to be lacking documentation of any assessment/s administered to injured athletes to determine their readiness for rehabilitation, which depending on the severity of the injury, could possibly represent a behavior change for that individual.

Objective:

To validate the application of the transtheoretical model to injury rehabilitation and assess the impact of stages of change on athletes’ adherence and compliance rates.

Design:

Descriptive correlational.

Setting:

Large Mid Atlantic Division I institution.

Participants:

Seventy injured athletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Readiness was assessed using the Transtheoretical Model. Adherence was assessed using the percentage of rehabilitation attendance and compliance was assessed using the Sport Injury Rehabilitation Scale.

Results:

Participants who were advanced in their stages of change generally reported an increase in self efficacy, utilization of pros versus cons, and the use of behavioral processes instead of experiential processes of change. No significant relationships were found between stages of change and athletes’ adherence and compliance.

Conclusion:

Although no statistical significance was found between stages of change and adherence and compliance the results did validate the application of the transtheoretical model to injury rehabilitation.

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Stefania Korologou, Vassilis Barkoukis, Lambros Lazuras and Haralambos Tsorbatzoudis

The current study used the transtheoretical model (TTM) as a guiding theoretical framework to assess differences in processes of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy among deaf individuals with different levels of physical activity. Overall, 146 participants (M age = 26.4 yr, SD = 4.28) completed anonymous questionnaires assessing the dimensions of the TTM, stages of change, processes of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy. Analysis of variance showed that both experiential and behavioral processes of change were higher in the preparation, action, and maintenance stages than in the other stages. Accordingly, the benefits of physical activity participation were stronger in the preparation stage, whereas the costs were more evident in the precontemplation stage. Finally, self-efficacy at the preparation stage was higher than in the other stages. The findings revealed how different stages of physical activity participation can be explained through the TTM, and the implications for physical activity intervention are discussed.

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Ashley A. Hansen, Joanne E. Perry, John W. Lace, Zachary C. Merz, Taylor L. Montgomery and Michael J. Ross

. Therefore, consistent with the goal of grounding sport psychology practice in clinical psychology methodology, the current paper provides preliminary support for a new assessment measure that serves as a transtheoretical monitoring instrument for applied sport psychology practice and fills the present gap

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Maria Kosma, Rebecca Ellis Gardner, Bradley J. Cardinal, Jeremy J. Bauer and Jeffrey A. McCubbin

A high proportion of individuals with disabilities remain physically inactive. Therefore, this study (web-based survey) investigated the relationships between the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) and physical activity among 224 adults with physical disabilities (M age = 45.4 years, SD = 10.78, females = 71%). Additionally, the most important TTM predictors of the stages of change and physical activity were examined. Standardized self-report scales of the TTM constructs and physical activity were completed. The study findings supported the theorized relationships between the TTM constructs and physical activity. The behavioral and cognitive processes of change distinguished the stages of change. These two constructs and self-efficacy mostly predicted physical activity (R 2 total = .18). The assessment methodology of the TTM constructs needs to be revisited.

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William V. Massey, Stacy L. Gnacinski and Barbara B. Meyer

Research has demonstrated the efficacy of psychological skills training (PST), yet many athletes do not appear ready to do whatever it takes to improve the mental aspects of performance. Although the transtheoretical model of behavior change (TTM), generally, and readiness to change, specifically, have received considerable attention in a range of allied health fields, few studies have been conducted to examine this construct in applied sport psychology. The purpose of the current study was to examine National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I athletes’ readiness for PST as it relates to their stage of change, decisional balance, self-efficacy, and use of processes of change. The data trends observed in the current study were consistent with the theoretical underpinnings of the TTM as well as previous research on NCAA Division I athletes. The results of the current study highlight the need to consider readiness to change when designing and implementing PST interventions.

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Stamatis Agiovlasitis, Joonkoo Yun, Jooyeon Jin, Jeffrey A. McCubbin and Robert W. Motl

). Researchers have applied several existing theoretical frameworks to PA promotion for people living with disabilities. These include the theory of planned behavior, the trans-theoretical model, self-determination theory, social cognitive theory, and ecological models. The theory of planned behavior attempts to

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Andrea S. Hartmann, Florian Steenbergen, Silja Vocks, Dirk Büsch and Manuel Waldorf

from existing English-language instruments ( Hildebrandt, Langenbucher, Lai, Loeb, & Hollander, 2011 ) and studies on APED use ( Bell, Dorsch, McCreary, & Hovey, 2004 ). The SAPEDI is based on health-psychological stage models of behavior change, such as the Transtheoretical Model of Change (e

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Emma V. Richardson, Sarah Blaylock, Elizabeth Barstow, Matthew Fifolt and Robert W. Motl

was done to reflect the transtheoretical model and the various stages of exercise adherence which are highlighted therein. Participants, however, did not perceive this to be reflective of their journey to exercise adherence. This is an interesting and important finding with regard to exercise

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Andrea R. Taliaferro and Sean M. Bulger

during practicum experiences before teaching in larger classes ( Hodge & Faison-Hodge, 2010 ). Along these lines, Jin, Yun, and Wegis ( 2013 ) proposed a transtheoretical model approach consisting of three curriculum stages (lecture-focused, lectures with teaching practicum, and internship-focused) to