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Zachary M. Gillen, Lacey E. Jahn, Marni E. Shoemaker, Brianna D. McKay, Alegra I. Mendez, Nicholas A. Bohannon and Joel T. Cramer

Vertical jump tests are among the most popular assessments of lower-body power for athletes. 1 – 6 Arguably, the most popular and common vertical jump test is the countermovement jump (CMJ). The CMJ involves a downward, eccentric movement followed by a rapid, maximal, upward, concentric vertical

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Jason Lake, Peter Mundy, Paul Comfort, John J. McMahon, Timothy J. Suchomel and Patrick Carden

Force plates are often used to measure countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) ability. This provides practitioners with information about the athletes’ capacity to accelerate their body mass using variables such as impulse, mean force, phase duration, 1 – 4 and the reactive strength index modified (i

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Hayley M. Ericksen, Caitlin Lefevre, Brittney A. Luc-Harkey, Abbey C. Thomas, Phillip A. Gribble and Brian Pietrosimone

concerned about the negative impact that reducing vGRF during landing may have on athletic performance (ie, vertical jump). Maximum vertical jump height (Vert max ) is commonly used to evaluate performance because of its ease of use as well as its ability to assess lower-extremity power. 19 Additionally

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Brad W. Willis, Katie Hocker, Swithin Razu, Aaron D. Gray, Marjorie Skubic, Seth L. Sherman, Samantha Kurkowski and Trent M. Guess

correlations to ACL injury risk. 3 – 5 Specifically, an excessive knee abduction angle (KAA), a measure of tibia displacement relative to the femur acquired by 3-dimensional motion capture systems, has been linked to elevated risk of injury to the ACL. 3 A bilateral jump-landing task, the drop vertical jump

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Guillermo Mendez-Rebolledo, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Eduardo Guzman-Muñoz, Valeska Gatica-Rojas, Alexis Dabanch-Santis and Francisco Diaz-Valenzuela

Vertical jumping is a motor ability commonly used in daily activities (eg, obtaining objects out of reach, avoiding obstacles). In sports, such as track and field, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball, and soccer, vertical jumping is also an excellent marker of lower limb muscle power. 1 – 3 Aside

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Gabriel Andrade Paz, Marianna de Freitas Maia, Haroldo Gualter Santana, Humberto Miranda, Vicente Lima and John D. Willson

Volleyball is the widely played sport in the world and requires several physiological attributes, such as aerobic profile, strength, vertical jump ability, agility, and speed, 1 which are frequently developed in strength and conditioning programs. 2 , 3 However, previous studies have shown a

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Luis F. Áragón-Vargas and M. Melissa Gross

The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in both the coordination patterns of segmental actions and the dynamics of vertical jumping that accompany changes in vertical jump performance (VJP) occurring from trial to trial in single subjects. Ground reaction forces and video data were analyzed for 50 maximal vertical jumps for 8 subjects. It was possible to predict VJP from whole-body or even segmental kinematics and kinetics in spite of the small jump performance variability. Best whole-body models included peak and average mechanical power, propulsion time, and peak negative impulse. Best segmental models included coordination variables and a few joint torques and powers. Contrary to expectations, VJP was lower for trials with a proximal-to-distal sequence of joint reversals.

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Loren Z.F. Chiu and George J. Salem

Sacral marker and pelvis reconstruction methods have been proposed to approximate total body center of mass during relatively low intensity gait and hopping tasks, but not during a maximum effort vertical jumping task. In this study, center of mass displacement was calculated using the pelvic kinematic method and compared with center of mass displacement using the ground-reaction force-impulse method, in experienced athletes (n = 13) performing restricted countermovement vertical jumps. Maximal vertical jumps were performed in a biomechanics laboratory, with data collected using an 8-camera motion analysis system and two force platforms. The pelvis center of mass was reconstructed from retro-reflective markers placed on the pelvis. Jump height was determined from the peak height of the pelvis center of mass minus the standing height. Strong linear relationships were observed between the pelvic kinematic and impulse methods (R 2 = .86; p < .01). The pelvic kinematic method underestimated jump height versus the impulse method, however, the difference was small (CV = 4.34%). This investigation demonstrates concurrent validity for the pelvic kinematic method to determine vertical jump height.

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Kevin R. Ford, Anh-Dung Nguyen, Eric J. Hegedus and Jeffrey B. Taylor

Virtual environments with real-time feedback can simulate extrinsic goals that mimic real life conditions. The purpose was to compare jump performance and biomechanics with a physical overhead goal (POG) and with a virtual overhead goal (VOG). Fourteen female subjects participated (age: 18.8 ± 1.1 years, height: 163.2 ± 8.1 cm, weight 63.0 ± 7.9 kg). Sagittal plane trunk, hip, and knee biomechanics were calculated during the landing and take-off phases of drop vertical jump with different goal conditions. Repeated-measures ANOVAs determined differences between goal conditions. Vertical jump height displacement was not different during VOG compared with POG. Greater hip extensor moment (P < .001*) and hip angular impulse (P < .004*) were found during VOG compared with POG. Subjects landed more erect with less magnitude of trunk flexion (P = .002*) during POG compared with VOG. A virtual target can optimize jump height and promote increased hip moments and trunk flexion. This may be a useful alternative to physical targets to improve performance during certain biomechanical testing, screening, and training conditions.

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Luis F. Aragón-Vargas and M. Melissa Gross

The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinesiological factors that distinguish good jumpers from poor ones, in an attempt to understand the critical factors in vertical jump performance (VJP). Fifty-two normal, physically active male college students each performed five maximal vertical jumps with arms akimbo. Ground reaction forces and video data were collected during the jumps. Subjects' strength was tested isometrically. Thirty-five potential predictor variables were calculated for statistical modeling by multiple-regression analysis. At the whole-body level of analysis, the best models (which included peak and average mechanical power) accounted for 88% of VJP variation (p < .0005). At the segmental level, the best models accounted for 60% of variation in VJP (p < .0005). Unexpectedly, coordination variables were not related to VJP. These data suggested that VJP was most strongly associated with the mechanical power developed during jump execution.