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  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
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Paulo Gentil, Tulio Cesar de Lima Lins, Ricardo Moreno Lima, Breno Silva de Abreu, Dario Grattapaglia, Martim Bottaro, Ricardo Jacó de Oliveira and Rinaldo Wellerson Pereira

The current study investigated the association between vitamin-D-receptor (VDR) genotypes with bone-mineral density (BMD) and its interaction with physical activity level (PAL). Individuals in a sample of 192 volunteers (67.84 ± 5.23 years) underwent BMD evaluation and were genotyped for VDR ApaI, BsmI, FokI, and TaqI polymorphisms. Haplotypes were reconstructed through expectation-maximization algorithm, and regression-based haplotype-specific association tests were performed with studied phenotypes. None of the polymorphisms were associated with BMD at any site; however, haplotype was associated with femoral-neck and Ward’s-triangle BMD. Interaction between PAL and VDR genotypes was significant for the FokI polymorphism at femoral-neck and Ward’s-triangle BMD. The FokI T/T genotype was associated with higher BMD in active women. It was concluded that VDR haplotypes, but not genotypes, are associated with femoral-neck and Ward’s-triangle BMD in post-menopausal women. Moreover, the results suggest that VDR FokI polymorphism might be a potential determinant of BMD response to physical activity.

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Tom Clifford

EIMD in Older Adults Results Study Subjects Age (years) Supplementation Design Exercise Time points a Blood markers Subjective and muscle function Cannon et al. ( 1990 ) 12 sedentary males 55–74 Vitamin E (400 IU) vs. placebo capsules × 2·days for 48 days preexercise and 10 days postexercise (from 48

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Ellen F. Binder

This pilot study evaluated (a) the feasibility of a group exercise program in an institutionalized population with dementia; (b) the effects of such a program on physical performance measures; and (c) the potential additional effects of vitamin D supplementation on gait and muscle strength. Nursing home residents (N = 25) with chronic dementia and mobility impairments attended a thrice weekly exercise class for 8 weeks. They were randomly assigned to receive either a vitamin D supplement or no supplement throughout the program. Between-group differences in the effectiveness of the exercise intervention were analyzed. Pre-to-post changes were also assessed for both groups combined. In postexercise comparisons of both groups, knee extensor torque at 0°/sec declined by 18.6% while performance of 1-RM for hip extension increased by 16.1%. Balance also improved. Although vitamin D levels increased significantly in the supplement group, the two groups did not differ in their response to the exercise intervention.

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Emily M. Haymes

Muscle glycogen is the primary source of energy during high intensity exercise. Increasing the carbohydrate content of the diet allows more glycogen to be stored. Some adolescent female athletes (gymnasts, dancers) do not consume adequate amounts of vitamin B6, folacin, and E. Many women have low dietary intakes of calcium and iron. Low calcium intake and physical inactivity are factors associated with the development of osteoporosis. Low iron intake is associated with the development of iron deficiency and anemia. Low ferritin levels (an index of body iron stores) are commonly observed in female athletes.

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Rameswar Pal, Som Nath Singh, Kaushik Halder, Omveer Singh Tomer, Awadh Bihari Mishra and Mantu Saha

Background:

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of yogic practice on resting metabolism and redox status.

Methods:

The study was conducted on 64 physically trained male volunteers selected randomly at the Air Force Academy. The yoga group (n = 34) practiced yogasana, pranayama, and meditation for 3 months (February–May 2011) and the control group (n = 30) performed physical training. Antioxidant variables in blood samples along with physiological parameters were estimated before and after 3 months.

Results:

No significant difference was noted between baseline data of the control group and yoga group. Reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E; the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione; and total antioxidant status were increased significantly following yogic practice. Activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase were significantly increased, whereas activity of glutathione peroxidase was significantly decreased following yogic practice. Oxidized glutathione decreased significantly following yogic practice. A nonsignificant decrease of hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and blood sugar was noted in the yoga group. Carbon dioxide elimination and peripheral oxygen saturation increased significantly following yogic practice. No significant changes were observed in the control group following 3 months of physical training.

Conclusions:

Regular yogic practice can improve resting metabolism and redox status of the practitioner.

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Stephanie Whisnant Cash, Shirley A.A. Beresford, Thomas L. Vaughan, Patrick J. Heagerty, Leslie Bernstein, Emily White and Marian L. Neuhouser

Background:

Limited evidence suggests that very high-intensity exercise is positively associated with DNA damage but moderate exercise may be associated with DNA repair.

Methods:

Participants were 220 healthy, Washington State 50- to 76-year-olds in the validity/biomarker substudy of the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort, who provided blood samples and completed questionnaires assessing recent physical activity and demographic and health factors. Measures included nested activity subsets: total activity, moderate- plus high-intensity activity, and high-intensity activity. DNA damage (n = 122) and repair (n = 99) were measured using the comet assay. Multivariate linear regression was used to estimate regression coefficients and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for relationships between MET-hours per week of activity and each DNA outcome (damage, and 15- and 60-minute repair capacities).

Results:

DNA damage was not associated with any measure of activity. However, 60-minute DNA repair was positively associated with both total activity (β = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.0057–0.412; P = .044) and high-intensity activity (β = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.20–0.60; P = .036), adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and current multivitamin use.

Conclusions:

This study is the first to assess broad ranges of activity intensity levels related to DNA damage and repair. Physical activity was unrelated to DNA damage but was associated with increased repair.

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Martin D. Hoffman, Linjun Chen and Eswar Krishnan

Background:

Little is known about the sociodemographics and lifestyle behaviors of ultramarathon runners, and the effects of these characteristics on body weight and body mass index (BMI).

Methods:

We cross-sectionally analyzed baseline data of 1212 ultramarathoners on sociodemographics, lifestyle behaviors and BMI from the initial 12-month enrollment period in a longitudinal observational study.

Results:

The ultramarathoners were mostly middle-aged men who were more educated, more likely to be in a stable relationship, and more likely to use over-the-counter vitamins/supplements than the general population. They appear to gain less body weight with advancing age than the general population. Factors with the greatest effect on current BMI were BMI at 25 years of age and sex, which explained 48% and 3% of the variance. Negligible, but statistically significant direct relationships, with BMI were observed for age, work hours per week, television watching hours per week, and composite fat consumption frequency score. Negligible, but statistically significant inverse relationships, with BMI were observed for running distance during the prior year, and composite fruit and vegetable consumption frequency score.

Conclusions:

While lifestyle decisions were found to impact BMI within this group of ultramarathoners, BMI at age 25 was the strongest predictor of current BMI.

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Heather L. Colleran, Andrea Hiatt, Laurie Wideman and Cheryl A. Lovelady

was made after baseline measurements were completed. All participants were given a year’s supply of a multivitamin supplement containing 10 μg of vitamin D. Laboratory Measurements BMD and Anthropometrics Bone density was measured using a different dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry machine for each

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Michael P. Corcoran, Miriam E. Nelson, Jennifer M. Sacheck, Kieran F. Reid, Dylan Kirn, Roger A. Fielding, Kenneth K.H. Chui and Sara C. Folta

, Teixeira, & Lazaretti-Castro, 2009 ; Tieland, Dirks, et al., 2012 ; Tieland, van de Rest, et al., 2012 ). Stimulation of anabolic factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been noted with postexercise protein and vitamin D supplementation, and therefore may aid in mitigating any age

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Dariush Sheikholeslami-Vatani, Slahadin Ahmadi and Hassan Faraji

.1 ± 168.3 Fat (g) 74.8 ± 43.6 78.2 ± 49.3 75.3 ± 45.7 Vitamin A (RE) 93.8 ± 28.6 89.3 ± 30.6 94.6 ± 29.8 Vitamin C (mg) 27.6 ± 11.4 28.3 ± 13.6 29.7 ± 15.6 Vitamin E (mg) 16.9 ± 6.9 16.4 ± 6.8 16.6 ± 9.5 EPA (mg) 94.8 ± 19.6 1823.1 ± 22.7* 96.4 ± 22.3 DHA (mg) 126.5 ± 25.8 974.2 ± 29.7* 135.1 ± 26