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Shona L Halson, Jonathan M. Peake and John P. Sullivan

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Marco Cardinale and Matthew C. Varley

The need to quantify aspects of training to improve training prescription has been the holy grail of sport scientists and coaches for many years. Recently, there has been an increase in scientific interest, possibly due to technological advancements and better equipment to quantify training activities. Over the last few years there has been an increase in the number of studies assessing training load in various athletic cohorts with a bias toward subjective reports and/or quantifications of external load. There is an evident lack of extensive longitudinal studies employing objective internal-load measurements, possibly due to the cost-effectiveness and invasiveness of measures necessary to quantify objective internal loads. Advances in technology might help in developing better wearable tools able to ease the difficulties and costs associated with conducting longitudinal observational studies in athletic cohorts and possibly provide better information on the biological implications of specific external-load patterns. Considering the recent technological developments for monitoring training load and the extensive use of various tools for research and applied work, the aim of this work was to review applications, challenges, and opportunities of various wearable technologies.

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Adam Douglas, Michael A. Rotondi, Joseph Baker, Veronica K. Jamnik and Alison K. Macpherson

shown to be a valid and reliable measure to count sport-based explosive actions in female athletes. 16 , 17 With the increased use of wearable technology to measure the work being performed in other sports, there is no research applying this technology in the sport of ice hockey. The purpose of this

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Paul G. Montgomery and Brendan D. Maloney

to offence. Shots made from beyond the traditional 3-point line are counted as 2 points. If a team reaches 21 points within the 10 minutes, they are deemed the winner. All other rules are consistent with traditional basketball. Wearable technology has become commonplace in many team sports

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Paul G. Montgomery and Brendan D. Maloney

, allowing teams to implement recovery strategies. The 3×3 basketball tournament competition requires several games a day over several days; hence, the perceived demands are considerably different. The objective of this study was to utilize wearable technology to assess the physical and physiological changes

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Louis Passfield and James G. Hopker

This paper explores the notion that the availability and analysis of large data sets have the capacity to improve practice and change the nature of science in the sport and exercise setting. The increasing use of data and information technology in sport is giving rise to this change. Web sites hold large data repositories, and the development of wearable technology, mobile phone applications, and related instruments for monitoring physical activity, training, and competition provide large data sets of extensive and detailed measurements. Innovative approaches conceived to more fully exploit these large data sets could provide a basis for more objective evaluation of coaching strategies and new approaches to how science is conducted. An emerging discipline, sports analytics, could help overcome some of the challenges involved in obtaining knowledge and wisdom from these large data sets. Examples of where large data sets have been analyzed, to evaluate the career development of elite cyclists and to characterize and optimize the training load of well-trained runners, are discussed. Careful verification of large data sets is time consuming and imperative before useful conclusions can be drawn. Consequently, it is recommended that prospective studies be preferred over retrospective analyses of data. It is concluded that rigorous analysis of large data sets could enhance our knowledge in the sport and exercise sciences, inform competitive strategies, and allow innovative new research and findings.

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Shona L. Halson, Alan G. Hahn and Aaron J. Coutts

high reliability but low ecological validity, while field assessments may have lower reliability but strong ecological validity. With the advent of wearable technologies, markerless motion-analysis systems, and sophisticated competition-analysis tools, there has been a rapid expansion of the ability to

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Blake D. McLean, Donald Strack, Jennifer Russell and Aaron J. Coutts

-related research. This section explores rules directly affecting the implementation of technologies and research related to understanding the physical demands of the NBA. Approved Technologies The NBA CBA states that teams may request players use the following wearable technologies: Adidas miCoach Elite systems

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John J. McMahon, Paul A. Jones, Timothy J. Suchomel, Jason Lake and Paul Comfort

practitioners who include the RSImod calculation in their ongoing athlete-monitoring battery but not through force-platform analysis (ie, those who calculate RSImod via wearable technology). The primary purpose of this study was, therefore, to quantitatively describe the influence of RSImod on CMJ force–, power

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Jacob A. Goldsmith, Cameron Trepeck, Jessica L. Halle, Kristin M. Mendez, Alex Klemp, Daniel M. Cooke, Michael H. Haischer, Ryan K. Byrnes, Robert F. Zoeller, Michael Whitehurst and Michael C. Zourdos

, Bland–Altman). Some studies have used agreement plots 1 , 4 yet did not compare the velocity calculator to a true criterion. Garnacho-Castaño et al 1 and Balsalobre-Fernández et al 4 used Bland–Altman plots for agreement of TWAS and wearable technology; however, these comparisons were made to other LPTs and not a