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Borja Muniz-Pardos, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alex González-Agüero, Alba Gómez-Cabello, José A. Casajús and Germán Vicente-Rodríguez

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is an oscillatory training method widely used in sports centers. 1 This protocol has been described as the sinusoidal oscillations produced by industrial machines which are transmitted to the human body, enhancing the tonic vibration reflex that stimulates reflex muscle

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Nuttaset Manimmanakorn, Jenny J. Ross, Apiwan Manimmanakorn, Samuel J.E. Lucas and Michael J. Hamlin

Purpose:

To compare whole-body vibration (WBV) with traditional recovery protocols after a high-intensity training bout.

Methods:

In a randomized crossover study, 16 athletes performed 6 × 30-s Wingate sprints before completing either an active recovery (10 min of cycling and stretching) or WBV for 10 min in a series of exercises on a vibration platform. Muscle hemodynamics (assessed via near-infrared spectroscopy) were measured before and during exercise and into the 10-min recovery period. Blood lactate concentration, vertical jump, quadriceps strength, flexibility, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), muscle soreness, and performance during a single 30-s Wingate test were assessed at baseline and 30 and 60 min postexercise. A subset of participants (n = 6) completed a 3rd identical trial (1 wk later) using a passive 10-min recovery period (sitting).

Results:

There were no clear effects between the recovery protocols for blood lactate concentration, quadriceps strength, jump height, flexibility, RPE, muscle soreness, or single Wingate performance across all measured recovery time points. However, the WBV recovery protocol substantially increased the tissue-oxygenation index compared with the active (11.2% ± 2.4% [mean ± 95% CI], effect size [ES] = 3.1, and –7.3% ± 4.1%, ES = –2.1 for the 10 min postexercise and postrecovery, respectively) and passive recovery conditions (4.1% ± 2.2%, ES = 1.3, 10 min postexercise only).

Conclusion:

Although WBV during recovery increased muscle oxygenation, it had little effect in improving subsequent performance compared with a normal active recovery.

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Bent R. Rønnestad, Gunnar Slettaløkken Falch and Stian Ellefsen

Postactivation-potentiation exercise with added whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a potential way to acutely improve sprint performance. In cycling, there are many competitions and situations where sprinting abilities are important.

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of adding WBV to warm-up procedures on subsequent cycle sprint performance.

Methods:

Eleven well-trained cyclists participated in the study. All cyclists performed a familiarization session before 2 separate test sessions in randomized order. Each session included a standardized warm-up followed by 1 of the following preconditioning exercises: 30 s of half-squats without WBV or 30 s of half-squats with WBV at 40 Hz. A 15-s Wingate sprint was performed 1 min after the preconditioning exercise.

Results:

Performing preconditioning exercise with WBV at 40 Hz resulted in superior peak power output compared with preconditioning exercise without WBV (1413 ± 257 W vs 1353 ± 213 W, P = .04) and a tendency toward superior mean power output during a 15-second all-out sprint (850 ± 119 W vs 828 ± 101 W, P = .08). Effect sizes showed a moderate practical effect of WBV vs no WBV on both peak and mean power output.

Conclusions:

Preconditioning exercise performed with WBV at 40 Hz seems to have a positive effect on cycling sprint performance in young well-trained cyclists. This suggests that athletes can incorporate body-loaded squats with WBV in preparations to specific sprint training to improve the quality of the sprint training and also to improve sprint performance in relevant competitions.

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Ronald Davis, Charlotte Sanborn, David Nichols, David M. Bazett-Jones and Eric L. Dugan

Bone mineral density (BMD) loss is a medical concern for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Concerns related to osteoporosis have lead researchers to use various interventions to address BMD loss within this population. Whole body vibration (WBV) has been reported to improve BMD for postmenopausal women and suggested for SCI. The purpose of this case study was to identify the effects of WBV on BMD for an individual with SCI. There were three progressive phases (standing only, partial standing, and combined stand with vibration), each lasting 10 weeks. Using the least significant change calculation, significant positive changes in BMD were reported at the trunk (0.46 g/cm2) and spine (.093 g/cm2) for phase 3 only. Increases in leg lean tissue mass and reduction in total body fat were noted in all three phases.

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-Concejero * Jesús Oliván * José L. Maté-Muñoz * Carlos Muniesa * Marta Montil * Ross Tucker * Alejandro Lucia * 4 2015 10 3 381 387 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0179 Effect of Whole-Body Vibration Therapy on Performance Recovery Nuttaset Manimmanakorn * Jenny J. Ross * Apiwan Manimmanakorn * Samuel J

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Practices of Competitive British Wheelchair Games Players Victoria L. Goosey-Tolfrey * Jeanette Crosland * 1 2010 27 1 47 59 10.1123/apaq.27.1.47 The Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Bone Mineral Density for a Person With a Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study Ronald Davis * Charlotte Sanborn * David

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* Joshua H. Guy * Nathan Elsworthy * Michele Lastella * David B. Pyne * Daniele Conte * Vincent J. Dalbo * 1 03 2020 15 3 409 415 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0107 ijspp.2019-0107 Long-Term Effects of Whole-Body Vibration in Trained Adolescent Swimmers: Does It Increase Strength, Power, and Swimming

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Basilio Pueo * Patrycja Lipinska * José M. Jiménez-Olmedo * Piotr Zmijewski * Will G. Hopkins * 8 2017 12 7 959 963 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0511 The Effect of Whole-Body Vibration on Subsequent Sprint Performance in Well-Trained Cyclists Bent R. Rønnestad * Gunnar Slettaløkken Falch * Stian

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Jeffrey D. Simpson, Ludmila Cosio-Lima, Eric M. Scudamore, Eric K. O’Neal, Ethan M. Stewart, Brandon L. Miller, Harish Chander and Adam C. Knight

netball players . Phys Ther Sport . 2018 ; 31 : 15 – 21 . PubMed ID: 29518691 doi:10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.01.003 29518691 10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.01.003 17. Dabbs N , Brown L , Garner J . Effects of whole body vibration on vertical jump performance following exercise induced muscle damage . Int J Kine