Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "whole-body vibration" x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
Clear All
Restricted access

Gregory Severino, Marcos Sanchez-Gonzalez, Michelle Walters-Edwards, Michael Nordvall, Oksana Chernykh, Jason Adames and Alexei Wong

postmenopausal women have difficulty adhering to traditional exercise programs and/or may stop exercising altogether ( Guérin & Fortier, 2012 ; O’Neill & Reid, 1991 ). It is crucial to address these barriers by implementing novel modalities such as whole-body vibration training (WBVT). WBVT has been used as an

Restricted access

Francisco Alvarez-Barbosa, Jesús del Pozo-Cruz, Borja del Pozo-Cruz, Antonio García-Hermoso and Rosa María Alfonso-Rosa

poorer mobility and balance compared with older people still living in the community ( Nitz & Josephson, 2011 ). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as an easy and safe alternative to conventional exercise for frail people, because it minimizes the need for conscious exertion and stress on the

Restricted access

Derek T. Smith, Stacey Judge, Ashley Malone, Rebecca C. Moynes, Jason Conviser and James S. Skinner

Reduced strength, balance, and functional independence diminish quality of life and increase health care costs. Sixty adults (82.2 ± 4.9 years) were randomized to a control or three 12-week intervention groups: bioDensity (bD); Power Plate (PP) whole-body vibration (WBV); or bD+PP. bD involved one weekly 5-s maximal contraction of four muscle groups. PP involved two 5-min WBV sessions. Primary outcomes were strength, balance, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). No groups differed initially. Strength significantly increased 22–51% for three muscle groups in bD and bD+PP (P < .001), with no changes in control and PP. Balance significantly improved in PP and bD+PP but not in control or bD. bD, PP, and bD+PP differentially improved FIM self-care and mobility. Strength improvements from weekly 5-min sessions of bD may impart health/clinical benefits. Balance and leg strength improvements suggest WBV beneficially impacts fall risk and incidence. Improved FIM scores are encouraging and justify larger controlled trials on bD and bD+PP efficacy.

Restricted access

Seong-won Han, Dae-yeon Lee, Dong-Sung Choi, Boram Han, Jin-Sun Kim and Hae-Dong Lee

This study aimed to examine whether muscle force and tendon stiffness in a muscle-tendon complex alter synchronously following 8-week whole-body vibration (WBV) training in older people. Forty older women aged 65 years and older were randomly assigned into control (CON, n = 15) and whole-body vibration (WBV) training groups (exposure time, n = 13; vibration intensity, n = 12). For the training groups, a 4-week detraining period was completed following the training period. Throughout the training/detraining period, force of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle and stiffness of the Achilles tendon were assessed four times (0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks) using a combined system of dynamometer and ultrasonography. While muscle force gradually increased throughout the training period (p < .05), a significant increase in tendon stiffness was observed after 8 weeks (p < .05). These findings indicated that, during the early phase of WBV training, muscle force and tendon stiffness changed asynchronously, which might be a factor in possible musculotendinous injuries.

Restricted access

Sven Rees, Aron Murphy and Mark Watsford

This study was designed to investigate the effects of vibration on muscle performance and mobility in a healthy, untrained, older population. Forty-three participants (23 men, 20 women, 66–85 y old) performed tests of sit-to-stand (STS), 5- and 10-m fast walk, timed up-and-go test, stair mobility, and strength. Participants were randomly assigned to a vibration group, an exercise-without-vibration group, or a control group. Training consisted of 3 sessions/wk for 2 mo. After training, the vibration and exercise groups showed improved STS (12.4%, 10.2%), 5-m fast walk (3.0%, 3.7%), and knee-extension strength (8.1%, 7.2%) compared with the control (p < 0.05). Even though vibration training improved lower limb strength, it did not appear to have a facilitatory effect on functional-performance tasks compared with the exercise-without-vibration group. Comparable mobility and performance changes between the experimental groups suggest that improvements are linked with greater knee-extension strength and largely attributed to the unloaded squats performed by both exercise groups.

Restricted access

Exercise Programs for Falls Prevention Lucy McPhate * Emily M. Simek * Terry P. Haines * Keith D. Hill * Caroline F. Finch * Lesley Day * 1 2016 24 1 129 138 10.1123/japa.2014-0168 Effects of bioDensity Training and Power Plate Whole-Body Vibration on Strength, Balance, and Functional

Restricted access

* Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij * 4 2017 25 2 277 286 10.1123/japa.2015-0295 Asynchronous Alterations of Muscle Force and Tendon Stiffness Following 8 Weeks of Resistance Exercise with Whole-Body Vibration in Older Women Seong-won Han * Dae-yeon Lee * Dong-Sung Choi * Boram Han * Jin-Sun Kim * Hae

Restricted access

.2019-0010 japa.2019-0010 Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Functional Mobility, Balance, Gait Strength, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Francisco Alvarez-Barbosa * Jesús del Pozo-Cruz * Borja del Pozo

Restricted access

Outdoor Physical Activity in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Germany: Findings From the ActiFE Study Florian Herbolsheimer * Stephanie Mosler * Richard Peter * the ActiFE Ulm Study Group 7 2017 27 06 2017 25 3 387 394 10.1123/japa.2016-0060 japa.2016-0060 Whole-Body Vibration Training Improves Heart

Restricted access

Renato Sobral Monteiro-Junior, Paulo de Tarso Maciel-Pinheiro, Eduardo da Matta Mello Portugal, Luiz Felipe da Silva Figueiredo, Rodrigo Terra, Lara S. F. Carneiro, Vinícius Dias Rodrigues, Osvaldo J. M. Nascimento, Andrea Camaz Deslandes and Jerson Laks

Periodized strength training 3 sets of 8, 10, and 12 reps for each exercise, respectively. 60% 1 RM (weeks 1, 2, and 3), 70% 1 RM (weeks 4, 5, and 6) and 80% 1 RM (weeks 7 and 8) Leg press, biceps curl, and seated pec deck machine   Rodriguez-Miguelez et al 33 (2015) 16 2 8 Whole-body vibration 1–2 reps per